La Serenissima office refurbishment
by Park Associati

| 5 comments
 

Italian studio Park Associati has overhauled a 1960s office block in Milan and added new glass and burnished aluminium facades (+ slideshow).

La Serenissima by Park Associati

The six-storey Palazzo Campari block was recently purchased by financial services firm Morgan Stanley, who wanted to adapt the fifty-year-old building and bring it up to modern standards. "The client wanted to turn a very inefficient building, very expensive to maintain, into a very efficent building," the architects told Dezeen.

La Serenissima by Park Associati

Park Associati re-planned the building with a more flexible layout by rationalising routes through the building and opening up the ground floor to accommodate additional uses.

La Serenissima by Park Associati

"The aim of the new scheme is to provide a maximum level of flexibility in terms of the division of the internal spaces, with a sense of uniformity given by the system of the internal lighting and improved access and circulation," said the architects.

La Serenissima by Park Associati

The original facades were replaced to create a more energy-efficient envelope. Along Via Turati the new elevations feature perforated and pressed aluminium panels that are back-lit by night, while the walls along Via Cavalieri are dominated by glazing.

La Serenissima by Park Associati

A landscaped courtyard is still concealed at the heart of the building and has been reworked with strips of planting and circular paving patterns.

La Serenissima by Park Associati

Other recently compelted office renovations include a 1950s office in Hamburg adapted by J. Mayer H. and an updated Art Deco building in London by David Adjaye.

La Serenissima by Park Associati

See more office architecture »

La Serenissima by Park Associati

Photography is by Andrea Martiradonna.

La Serenissima by Park Associati

Here's some more information from Park Associati:


Building refurbishment for "La Serenissima" offices
Via Turati, Milano

The building known as "Palazzo Campari" was designed in the 1960s by Ermenegildo and Eugenio Soncini in the heart of Milan and was one of a series of buildings that emerged during the economic boom years, representing a new aspect of corporate identity for Italian industry. It was originally characterised by the burnished colour of the metal structure of the facade, tinted glass of the curtain walling and the brown metallic paint used for the smaller block in via Cavalieri given over to residential use.

La Serenissima by Park Associati

When it was built, it was considered to be modern and technologically advanced, even experimental. Today however, many of its undeniably attractive aspects have become outdated with regards to current standards of building construction. For this reason the new owner, aware of its quality and evocative presence, decided to bring in architects to redesign the complex.

La Serenissima by Park Associati

With respect to the original layout, the aim of the new scheme was to provide a maximum level of flexibility in terms of the division of the internal spaces with sense of uniformity also given by the system of the internal lighting and improved access and circulation.

La Serenissima by Park Associati

Other elements central to the design were the use of additional space at ground floor level as well as an overall reworking of the structure of the elevations, made much more open and vibrant especially on via Turati and part of via Cavalieri.

La Serenissima by Park Associati

With the elevations pulled back with respect to the original boundary it has been possible to eliminate cold bridging – at the time not considered – the useful floor area has been shifted allowing new spaces to be built at ground level, now given over to tertiary use.

La Serenissima by Park Associati

The landscaped courtyard meanwhile, the heart of the original scheme, has been retained and reworked into a bright new design.

La Serenissima by Park Associati

The new elevations are the main feature of the design. On via Turati boxes in perforated and press-formed aluminium in a burnished colour (lit up at night) are used in a rhythm that enables the elevation to be reworked also to ensure maximum flexibility in terms of the division of the internal spaces.

La Serenissima by Park Associati

In the courtyard a close relationship has been created between the interior and exterior; on via Cavalieri the original lower elevation that is in direct relation with the nearby Cà Brutta, appears sleek and flat, with predominant use of grey for the glazed surfaces, smooth and reflecting its historic surroundings.

La Serenissima by Park Associati

Client: Morgan Stanley Sgr S.p.A.
Location: Via Turati 25-27, Via Cavalieri 4, Milano
Schedule: 2008 – concorso, 2008 – 2010 Progettazione, 2010 – 2012 Cantiere
Gross Floor Area: Slp 7988.84 mq
Construction Cost: 11.000.000 Euro
Architect: Park Associati (Filippo Pagliani, Michele Rossi)

La Serenissima by Park Associati

Project Team: Marco Panzeri, Project Manager, Alice Cuteri, Andrea Dalpasso, Marinella Ferrari, Stefano Lanotte, Marco Siciliano, Paolo Uboldi, Fabio Calciati (rendering)
Site supervision, Structural, Mechanical and Electrical Engineering: General Planning
Design Team: Giovanni Bonini, Loris Colombo, Walter Cola, Luca Dagrada, Franco Pesci, Paolo Rossanigo, Roberto Villa, Luigi Zinco

La Serenissima by Park Associati

Artistic Site Supervision: Park Associati, Arch. Marco Panzeri
Project Management: ECHarris Built Asset Consultancy
Landscape Project: Marco Bay Architetto
General Contractor: Mangiavacchi e Pedercini S.p.A.

La Serenissima by Park Associati

Above: ground floor plan - click above for larger image and key

  • Stuart

    Fantastic re-use of a 1960s building and quite a beautiful one at that. Long live 1960s architecture!

  • Quirin

    Neat detailing and nice rigorous technical facade, but sadly anonymous. The third image from above shows the “layered” building next to it and you see all the character and beauty of Milano. Its a pity the new building doesn’t at least try to relate to it. Context!

  • mindgame

    And no photos from before?

    • Hornithologist

      I agree, that is the only negative aspect of this post. Otherwise a very nice bit of work.

    • zino

      One more vote for a BEFORE photo.