Primitive knife by Michele Daneluzzo
for Del Ben

| 21 comments
 

Product news: Italian designer Michele Daneluzzo took inspiration from tools used by early humans when designing this stainless steel knife (+ slideshow).

Primitive knife by Michele Daneluzzo for Del Ben

The implement is formed from one petal-shaped piece of steel, reminiscent of flint cutting utensils from the Stone Age.

Primitive knife by Michele Daneluzzo for Del Ben

"The project analyses the different aspects of the intrinsic relationship between mankind and design, proposing to the modern culture a forgotten tool," Daneluzzo told Dezeen.

Primitive knife by Michele Daneluzzo for Del Ben

Instead of a handle found on contemporary knives, a subtle ridge runs along the thicker top of the blade to aid grip.

Primitive knife by Michele Daneluzzo for Del Ben

The shape slims towards the front and bottom to create the sharp cutting edge.

Primitive knife by Michele Daneluzzo for Del Ben

The knife is available in polished or blasted steel and is stored upright on a pebble-like stand that comes included.

Primitive knife by Michele Daneluzzo for Del Ben

Daneluzzo developed the product while studying at the University of Applied Arts in Vienna, and it is currently in production with Italian cutlery brand Del Ben.

Primitive knife by Michele Daneluzzo for Del Ben

It was launched at the Ambiente trade fair in Frankfurt earlier the year, where pans with hooks instead of handles by Karim Rashid were also unveiled.

Primitive knife by Michele Daneluzzo for Del Ben

We've featured quite a few stories about unusual cutlery, such as a set designed to stimulate all five senses and a range modelled on workshop tools.

See all our stories about cutlery »
See all our stories about homeware »

  • Sandra

    Perfect. It’s actually strange how nobody has thought about it before and how come that type of knife is not one of the most common types that we use every day? I want it!

  • SNP

    I wonder if the blade depth will obscure your view of the cut?

  • http://squawktalk.tumblr.com Jes

    I would love to chop veggies that way. Seems so much more ergonomic!

  • http://www.zazous.co.uk Kate Austin

    Exiting! I can really see this taking off – I’d love to try it out. Would make a great present too.

  • smack

    I wonder if it will sharpen well.

  • bonsaiman

    How to avoid thoughtlessly grasping the blade from the wrong edge? It took mankind millennia to develop handles and we did it for a reason.

  • Micah

    Any idea of when and where it will be available?

    • http://www.dailygrail.com Red Pill Junkie

      Next Ice Age ;)

  • http://twitter.com/guillifreire @guillifreire

    As beautiful as primitive design.

  • http://Flavorsandmore.com Steven

    Quite elegant but hmm.. a bit slippery when wet, no?

  • Cate

    Someone shurely will soon invent the wheel too. It will be revolutionary!

    • bonsaiman

      It is a whole new trend. They are making fire rubbing 3D printed sticks now.

  • aronmidn

    I came to a similar conclusion when designing a lobster cracker: http://s3images.coroflot.com/user_files/individua

  • Lohen Grinn

    Beautiful as an object – would love to have it. That notwithstanding (and I hate to sound like my Grandmother) but I’m not entirely convinced of its practicality and ease of use since the guy in the picture looks like he is making a mess of that salmon! Perhaps it’s best suited to the cheeseboard.

  • http://www.waterblast.pro/ Judy Jackson

    Wow, that’s amazing! Very nice and unique utencils. I would definitely love to try it.

  • NND

    One finger salad coming up!

  • Chris

    I’d say a definition between the sharp end and the blunt end should have been a key factor in this. Yes, it would disrupt the minimal aesthetic, but at least you’ll have all your fingers left after picking it up. Lovely idea though and definitely a road to continue down.

  • Tony B

    Anyone that actually cooks – as opposed to being one who pretends to cook but doesn’t – will acknowledge this is quite ridiculous. I’m all for form, but this is silly.

  • Marc Vlemmings

    Some twenty years ago designer Michael Schneider designed a knife quite similar to Michele Daneluzzo’s knife for the German company Mono. He also designed a fork and two spoons all inspired by the tools of the Neanderthals. Mono still has this set of cutlery in its collection.

  • Frederic

    You can order it online at <a href="http://www.propassione.com” target=”_blank”>www.propassione.com for €169.90

  • Ed Heuvelink

    I am left handed, this is right handed. For me a hopeless design.