House in Yoro by
Airhouse Design Office

| 9 comments
 

A bedroom and bathroom are hidden inside a white box in this converted warehouse by Japanese architects Airhouse Design Office (+ slideshow).

House in Yoro by Airside Design Office

Located in Yoro, a small town in Gifu Prefecture, the main space of the house is on the first floor of the converted warehouse, accessed via a staircase inside the ground-floor garage.

House in Yoro by Airside Design Office

Airhouse Design Office inserted a large white box in the centre of the space, creating private rooms inside and a loft above.

House in Yoro by Airside Design Office

Designed for a couple who are keen on cooking, the focal point of the house is the large kitchen.

House in Yoro by Airside Design Office

The kitchen units were made from ash, while artificial marble was used on the worktops and table.

House in Yoro by Airside Design Office

To minimise heat loss in the large space, a thick layer of urethane foam was added to the walls and ceiling before they were covered in plywood panels.

House in Yoro by Airside Design Office

The loft is accessed by a wide white staircase and used as a children's bedroom.

House in Yoro by Airside Design Office

Inside the box is the main bedroom, painted a deep shade of purple, a lime green bathroom and a separate toilet.

House in Yoro by Airside Design Office

Airhouse Design Office was founded by architect Keiichi Kiriyama in 2009 and is based in Ogaki, a city in Gifu Prefecture.

House in Yoro by Airside Design Office

Other houses in Japan we've featured lately include a building based on the Fibonacci mathematical sequence and an extension featuring tree trunks that stretch from floor to ceiling– see all Japanese houses.

House in Yoro by Airside Design Office

Photographs are by Toshiyuki Yano.

Here's some more information from the architect:


House in Yoro

One of our client's major requirements was for a living space where the presence of the family would always be felt. In response, we devised a single-room layout without columns that took advantage of the distinctive features of the existing warehouse.

House in Yoro by Airside Design Office

A large kitchen was installed to cater to the needs of the food-loving husband-and-wife couple. We then conceived the entire living space by taking the kitchen as a focal point, with a mix of various other activities and functions unfolding around it.

House in Yoro by Airside Design Office

Within this single-roomed space, we also created a box-like structure with a loft bedroom for the children on top of it, and private quarters including a bedroom and bathroom inside it.

House in Yoro by Airside Design Office

In order to minimize heat loss within this massive space, a 100mm layer of urethane foam was added to the walls, floors and ceiling, while a combined heat and power device was installed in the living room to heat water and provide floor heating.

House in Yoro by Airside Design Office

All openings were designed by making use of existing sash windows and doors, while glass panes were all given a double-glazing treatment to improve insulation.

House in Yoro by Airside Design Office

The façade of the building was left intact in an effort to blend in with the surrounding neighborhood, as well as due to cost considerations.

House in Yoro by Airside Design Office

Above: ground floor plan

The result was a comfortable, luxurious home that made effective use of existing features while also avoiding excessive expense.

House in Yoro by Airside Design Office

Above: first floor plan

Location: Yoro, Gifu
Date of Completion: May 2012
Principal Use: Private House

House in Yoro by Airside Design Office

Above: mezzanine plan

Structure: Steel Frame
Site area: 1027.34 sq m
Total Floor Area: 131.58 sq m

House in Yoro by Airside Design Office

Above: section

House in Yoro by Airside Design Office

Above: section

  • Concerned Citizen

    So, the parents and children alike must traipse through the living room, the dinning room, AND the kitchen to use the bathroom? Is it just me, or is that an incredibly bad plan?

    • Sam

      Or they can just use the en-suite.

      • Juan Galicia

        Even there, the bathroom doesn’t open towards the room but to the hallway and it’s not even a full bathroom (doesn’t look like it). I just find the plan to be quite strange.

    • paco

      This might looks strange at first sight and I understand what you mean, but the dynamic of living here it is not at all like in the west. I’m an Architect from Mexico living in Japan and I’ve come to love this order and integration of space.

      The bathroom is not as far after all and you will used it just once a day, usually at night by turns before dinner time. The toilet is at hand and given a proper place within the composition. There is joy in being aware of the others members of the family at all times – you live most of the time outside at school or work and home is your private world to be with family. In Japan, it is not common to have evening visitors.

      I like it a lot. I wouldn’t might having a garden instead of some of the parking space.

      • Martin

        A proper place within the composition? That should never be the excuse for a bad floor plan. I see a dangerously designed kids’ bedroom without a proper railing and without any privacy. This great conceptual gesture would be nice and functional when it was just a platform for playing, designed safely.

        Now it seems to lack some height for a good spatial effect.

        Overall some nice details, I like the ground floor entrance to the stairs.

      • Concerned citizen

        You mean, people in the east don't use the bathroom?

  • http://Www.45kilo.com Daniel

    Nice project and beautiful selection of plants! What is the name of the plant on the right side of the second image? Thanks.

  • studio

    And no explanation for the furniture in the master bedroom.

  • Jt30

    It’s an alright space, but the toilet and shower on either side of the master bedroom would probably get noisy. The railings would surely be hazardous for small children.