House in Muko by
FujiwaraMuro Architects

| 10 comments
 

Huge vertical louvres give a pleated appearance to this family house in Kyoto by FujiwaraMuro Architects (+ slideshow).

House in Muko by Fujiwara Muro Architects

The louvred facade curves around the south-east edge of the house to follow the shape of a road running alongside. Two-storey-high windows are slotted between each of the louvres to allowing natural to filter evenly through the wall, casting a variety of shadows across the interiors at different times of the day.

House in Muko by Fujiwara Muro Architects

"The movements of the sun can be felt inside the house all throughout the year," explain architects Shintaro Fujiwara and Yoshio Muro.

House in Muko by Fujiwara Muro Architects

The entrance to the house is positioned beyond the louvres and leads into an open-plan living and dining room that occupies most of the ground floor.

House in Muko by Fujiwara Muro Architects

A bedroom sits at the rear of this space and is entirely filled by a double bed, but residents can open this room out to the living room with a set of sliding partitions.

House in Muko by Fujiwara Muro Architects

A staircase is tucked into the rear corner of the living room and leads up towards a children's bedroom on the first floor. This floor is set back from the wall at the rear, creating a balcony overlooking the level below.

House in Muko by Fujiwara Muro Architects

From this room, another staircase ascends towards the bathroom and washroom, then heads up again to reach a small rooftop terrace.

House in Muko by Fujiwara Muro Architects

Shintaro Fujiwara and Yoshio Muro founded FujiwaraMuro Architects in 2002. Past projects include House of Slope, with a corridor coiling around its floors.

House in Muko by Fujiwara Muro Architects

See more Japanese houses on Dezeen, including a converted warehouse with rooms contained inside a white box.

House in Muko by Fujiwara Muro Architects

Photography is by Toshiyuki Yano.

Here are a few words from Fujiwara Muro:


House in Muko

A mezzanine-floored residence consisting of a single-roomed space, located on a fan-shaped site.

House in Muko by Fujiwara Muro Architects

Above: ground floor plan - click for larger image

The movements of the sun can be felt inside the house all throughout the year. Light coming from the east strikes the louvered boards before entering the house and reaching deep into its interior. Direct sunlight from the south traces a shower-like path of lines as it penetrates into the building. Light coming from the west reflects off the walls of this house with an open stairwell before entering it.

House in Muko by Fujiwara Muro Architects

Above: first and second floor plans - click for larger image

Location: Muko, Kyoto, Japan
Principle use: single family house
Site area: 295.67 sqm
Building area: 56.36 sqm
Total floor area: 100.19 sqm
Project architect: Shintaro Fujiwara, Yoshio Muro
Project team: Fujiwarramuro Architects
Structure: timber

House in Muko by Fujiwara Muro Architects

Above: long section - click for larger image

House in Muko by Fujiwara Muro Architects

Above: cross section - click for larger image

House in Muko by Fujiwara Muro Architects

Above: east elevation

House in Muko by Fujiwara Muro Architects

Above: south elevation

  • dylan

    It looks like a giant radiator. Inside it looks like you have giant vertical blinds in front of your house, only you have no option of opening or closing them.

  • gudrungudrun

    I dont think that’s necessarily a bad looking building. No?

  • http://www.zazous.co.uk Kate Austin

    Beautiful. Great use of a tricky site too.

  • Andi

    It looks unrefined. The radiator stuff is too bulky for the building’s size.

  • stuart

    There must be a lot of quality plasterers in Japan at the moment.

  • mathewfaltas

    There’s literally nothing to stop someone driving into that.

    • Hannah

      How about common sense?

  • Gary Walmsley

    I really appreciate the huge vertical louvres that comprise the inside and outside of this house, it gives it some character. The vast majority of modern Japanese houses I see on dezeen and other sites are almost all sterile, severe and bleak things, obsessed with achieving some kind of fanatical minimalism.

    When that aesthetic was applied to traditional materials of wood and stone, the results were quite elegant. But when done in concrete and steel, I find it oppressive.

  • borborygmia

    Bathroom is two stories up from the bedroom? Nope, nope, nope!

  • Chipper

    It’s an elegant design, but where is all the floor space? For a 3,000 sq ft abode, all the spaces looked relatively cramped.