House in Sayo by
FujiwaraMuro Architects

| 15 comments
 

Boxy wooden rooms branch out from a crooked blue spine at this family house in Sayo, Japan, in our second story this week about the work of FujiwaraMuro Architects.

House in Sayo by FujiwaraMuro Architects

Simply titled House in Sayo, the single-storey residence is located beside a car park in a sparsely populated residential district.

House in Sayo by FujiwaraMuro Architects

FujiwaraMuro Architects planned the house around a meandering corridor, contained with the deep blue volume, and it swells in two places to accommodate a living room in the middle and a dining room at the end.

House in Sayo by FujiwaraMuro Architects

"A narrow space threads through the center of this house, expanding and shrinking, curving and meandering," explain architects Shintaro Fujiwara and Yoshio Muro. "This part of the house morphs and transforms to become a space for relaxation, study, reading or tea time."

House in Sayo by FujiwaraMuro Architects

Timber-clad rooms protrude outwards along the sides. One functions as the entrance, while the others contain bedrooms, bathrooms, a kitchen and a traditional Japanese room.

House in Sayo by FujiwaraMuro Architects

A seating area is located within the recess cerated by one of the boxes and a small terrace is slotted between two boxes on the south side of the building.

House in Sayo by FujiwaraMuro Architects

Shintaro Fujiwara and Yoshio Muro founded FujiwaraMuro Architects in 2002. Past projects include a house with a corridor coiling around its floors and the recently completed House in Muko, which features a facade of huge vertical louvres.

House in Sayo by FujiwaraMuro Architects

See more Japanese houses on Dezeen, including a converted warehouse with rooms contained inside a white box.

House in Sayo by FujiwaraMuro Architects

Photography is by Toshiyuki Yano.

House in Sayo by FujiwaraMuro Architects

Here is a few words from FujiwaraMuro Architects:


House in Sayo

A narrow space threads through the center of this house, expanding and shrinking, curving and meandering. This part of the house morphs and transforms to become a space for relaxation, study, reading, or teatime.

House in Sayo by FujiwaraMuro Architects

We built a small room in the middle of this space. As the width of these branches changes, the purpose of this room, along with its relationship with the surrounding space, transforms along with it.

House in Sayo by FujiwaraMuro Architects

Location: Sayo, Hyogo, Japan
Principle use: single family house
Site area: 262.53 sqm
Building area: 82.78 sqm
Total floor area: 81.26 sam
Project architect: Shintaro Fujiwara, Yoshio Muro
Project team: fujiwarramuro architects
Structure: timber

House in Sayo by FujiwaraMuro Architects

Above: floor plan - click for larger image

House in Sayo by FujiwaraMuro Architects

Above: cross section

  • albifix

    Minimalist and elegant. Very nice.

  • mik

    Nice corridor space. Looks like a hybrid between a kindergarden and house. Very nice.

  • Rafel

    Japan is different.

  • yoko

    Really nice, but I just hope baby won’t fall down from bench when it wakes up. But really nice.

  • sara

    It seems like function follows form which, although beautiful on the interior, seems very institutional on the exterior. Not convinced by the living room in the corridor thing (and it doesn’t seem like the clients are either, having clearly taken up the girls room with a couch for a space to sit together as a family).

  • Steven

    Ah, such a rich interior but such a barren exterior site.

  • Concerned Citizen

    The exterior of the house is pretty good, but stay out. Making a wide hallway and calling it a living area doesn’t make it livable. Add to that everyone passing through the “living area” to go to the bathroom – ugh. The house appears to have plopped from outer space onto a parking lot.

  • dg10

    This can’t be called a house. It has no redeeming features at all. A strangely shaped box in a car park that creates a harsh interior. I feel sorry for the poor kids who have to call this a home. Maybe I just don’t understand Japanese living, but don’t get this.

  • http://www.dailygrail.com Red Pill Junkie

    That corridor looks awfully narrow in some areas :-/

  • Mon

    From the exterior, I thought it was a public restroom. Shame. The interior has a very modest sense of scale which could have been beautifully reflected to the outside.

  • http://www.zazous.co.uk Kate Austin

    Beautiful interior that makes you want to explore. Awful location.

  • Roger Emmerson

    Brilliant, but, oh dear, what a terrible site!

  • Donkey

    From the outside, it’s as if they had to battle with many elements typical of a dense urban brownfield site (not overlooking neighbours, unusual plot shape, etc).

    But it seems clear there were actually none, therefore it seems curious they opted to constrict themselves in the way they have. I guess they must be happy with it though.

  • Taylor

    Kitchen ceiling looks a bit low.

  • Gary Walmsley

    The interior is OK, if you like bleakness, but the exterior looks like a highway rest stop.