Markthuis by
Barcode Architects

| 9 comments
 

Dutch studio Barcode Architects has renovated a house in Belgium to make room to display a collection of hunting trophies.

Markthuis by Barcode Architects

Named Markthuis, the two-storey residence has been reconfigured to create a central atrium, helping to bring more daylight onto a double-height "exhibition wall" of paintings and antlers.

Markthuis by Barcode Architects

Barcode Architects replaced the original staircase with a freestanding wooden structure that folds back and forth through the atrium between clear-glass balustrades.

Markthuis by Barcode Architects

A frosted glass wall separates the staircase from the entrance lobby just in front, where a bearskin rug is spread across the floor.

Markthuis by Barcode Architects

Beyond the atrium, most of the original partitions have been removed to create a large open-plan space on both storeys. At ground-floor level, this room functions as reception room for entertaining guests, while the floor above is used as a general living and dining room.

Markthuis by Barcode Architects

"From any point in the villa there is a clear view out, to the sky and the green," says Barcode Architects. "Combined with the 'lofty' floor plan, it delivers the house with a unique transparency and quality."

Markthuis by Barcode Architects

Other recently completed house renovations include a converted stable block in England and an overhauled townhouse in the Netherlands. See more renovations on Dezeen.

Photography is by Christian van der Kooij.

Here's some more information from Barcode Architects:


Barcode Architects 'Markthuis' is completed

Barcode Architects design for the extension and renovation of 'Markthuis' is completed. The design is driven by the desire to optimise the daylighting in the house and the wish of the client to reserve a prominent place for his large collection of art and hunting trophies.

Markthuis by Barcode Architects
Ground floor plan - click for larger image

In order to maximize the spatial experience most of the interior walls are removed to remain with one open living space extending over the first two floors of the villa. Downstairs are comfortable spaces for receiving guests while on the upper first floor more intimate and private areas with an open plan kitchen, study, and lounge area are situated.

Markthuis by Barcode Architects
First floor plan - click for larger image

A large atrium connects the two layers and provides space for an exclusive, double high exhibition wall with an impressive amount of artefacts. The wooden staircase is placed as a freestanding piece of furniture within the vide, on one side guided by a 6 meter tall piece of glass. The glazed element separates the kitchen and the entrance lobby from the rest of the house and offers exciting plays of light and shadow.

Markthuis by Barcode Architects
Long section - click for larger image

Notice: Barcode Architects
Location: Belgium
Stage: Realized
Client: Private
Area: 400 sqm

  • anonymous

    Well done. Nice floor. I don’t get the space next to the staircase though. Inverse the direction of the stairs and you wouldn’t waste (the now unusable) ground floor space.

  • http://www.zazous.co.uk Kate Austin

    I’d like to see evidence of the “clear view out to the sky and the green” as although it’s an impressive light and airy space there are no shots of the views. Nice job though.

  • Andy

    What kind of Neanderthal still hangs bits of dead animals to a wall expecting it to pass as decoration?

    • Mendoza

      I agree with that – how would the head of the owner look hanging on the wall?

  • Concerned Citizen

    Either keep a person on board for constant cleaning of the glass on the stair, or just accept dirt and smudges.

  • andres

    Horrifying!

  • superbird

    Hmmm… morally dubious to say the least.

  • Paola Gamez

    Poor animals! Murderer. Scary and horrifying space.

  • ivan marquez

    What? I can’t believe this! They should hang the owner as well… what a shame.