Frame House by
Jonathan Tuckey Design

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British studio Jonathan Tuckey Design has added skeletal partitions and skylights to bring more light into this renovated west London mews house.

Frame House by Jonathan Tuckey Design

Jonathan Tuckey Design renovated the Grade II-listed building for a private client and his dog, creating a two-storey home with a combined living and dining room on the first floor.

Frame House by Jonathan Tuckey Design

The planning authorities were reluctant to let the architects design an open-plan layout for the space, so they instead added see-through stud walls that follow the exact footprint of the original interior.

Frame House by Jonathan Tuckey Design

"We negotiated a difficult planning process in order to achieve this aesthetic in the Frame House," architect Nic Howett told Dezeen. "The open plan with frame walls allowed light to flood deep into the plan."

Frame House by Jonathan Tuckey Design

Five skylights bring light to different parts of the space. "A large roof light over the stairs allowed light to flood down to the ground floor," said Howett.

Frame House by Jonathan Tuckey Design

Walls present a mixture of exposed brickwork and timber panelling, while the kitchen is finished in stainless steel and there's also a reading corner.

Frame House by Jonathan Tuckey Design

Entrances lead into the house on both storeys. The downstairs entrance opens into a red-painted workshop and garage, used by the client to store his motorbikes.

Frame House by Jonathan Tuckey Design

The master bedroom is positioned alongside, while storage spaces line the edges of the corridor, and a bathroom and wet room are tucked away behind.

Frame House by Jonathan Tuckey Design

A birch plywood staircase connects the two floors.

Frame House by Jonathan Tuckey Design

This year Jonathan Tuckey Design also converted a historic chapel in Wiltshire, England, into a house with a blackened-timber extension conceived as the building's shadow.

Photography is by Ioana Marinescu.

Here's a short description from the architects:


Frame House

The reconstruction of a Grade II listed mews house in Holland Park, West London.

Beyond the refurbished historic exterior an entry hallway with a red-pigmented concrete floor acts as both a workshop and display case for our client’s collection of vintage motorbikes, which can be seen from within the house through a large glazed partition.

Frame House by Jonathan Tuckey Design

The ground floor also houses the master bedroom and bathroom. Opposite the hallway a birch-ply staircase is inserted into a double-height space which is lined with black MDF.

Frame House by Jonathan Tuckey Design

On the first floor a framework of timber studs is located where the original walls stood, creating an open, but layered kitchen and living space. The original roof structure is visible above this framework and new skylights with timber cowls bring in natural light.

Frame House by Jonathan Tuckey Design

A crisp, stainless steel kitchen contrasts with the exposed brick walls and the study is lined in Douglas Fir panelling. Skilled craftsmanship elevates the modest palette of materials to create a characterful modern home.

Frame House by Jonathan Tuckey Design
Site plan - click for larger image
Frame House by Jonathan Tuckey Design
Ground floor plan - click for larger image
Frame House by Jonathan Tuckey Design
First floor plan - click for larger image
Frame House by Jonathan Tuckey Design
Roof plan - click for larger image
Frame House by Jonathan Tuckey Design
Section - click for larger image
  • kyhcass

    Beautiful. It’s rare to find a house you can actually imagine living in. Bravo.

  • SOO

    AMAZING!

  • DK405

    The bare bones approach is not easy to pull off but these guys did it. The design is humble and down to earth and has a wonderful light quality to it.

  • Concerned Citizen

    Well done.

  • Damian

    What’s the little ‘escape’ hatch from the bedroom all about?!

    • Romain_M

      That’s Aslan’s kitty door.

  • villainesta

    Initially I had reservations about the all stainless kitchen among all the more humble materials but after some thought, I can’t imagine anything else. Nice work!