Furniture made from waste tiles
by Tsuyoshi Hayashi

| 7 comments
 

Cologne 2014: Eindhoven designer Tsuyoshi Hayashi has used discarded roof tiles to create curving seats for a series of stools and benches (+ slideshow).

Furniture made from waste tiles by Tsuyoshi Hayashi

Hayashi gathered the traditional kawara tiles from a factory in Takahama, a city in Japan with a long history of producing the curved roof tiles from local clay.

Furniture made from waste tiles by Tsuyoshi Hayashi

Across Japan, a five percent rate of kawara tiles being damaged during production results in more than 65,000 pieces being sent to landfill every year.

Furniture made from waste tiles by Tsuyoshi Hayashi

Hayashi cuts off the chipped or cracked parts of the damaged tiles and fixes them to a wooden frame that he designed to fit the standardised shape so no nails or glue are required for assembly.

Furniture made from waste tiles by Tsuyoshi Hayashi

"The smooth curved shape [of the tiles] invites people to sit and it keeps one's posture straight ergonomically," Hayashi told Dezeen.

The designer added that the processes used to manufacture the tiles make them extremely durable and weatherproof so they can be used outdoors.

Furniture made from waste tiles by Tsuyoshi Hayashi

"Japanese roof tiles are fired in more than 1200 degrees [Celsius], which makes them harder than the ones in Europe, which are mostly fired at around 800 degrees," said Hayashi. "A single chair can support a person weighing up to 120 kilograms."

Furniture made from waste tiles by Tsuyoshi Hayashi

Other properties that attracted Hayashi to seek out a new function for these redundant objects included the variety of textures and colours that are produced.

Furniture made from waste tiles by Tsuyoshi Hayashi

"Smoked roof tiles gives an ageing texture to the surface, and colours are created continuously by glazing companies as waste material after they showed them to the clients," said the designer.

Furniture made from waste tiles by Tsuyoshi Hayashi

The wooden frames can be constructed as single pieces or combined to create long benches with legs of different heights.

Furniture made from waste tiles by Tsuyoshi Hayashi

Hayashi graduated from Design Academy Eindhoven last year and opened his own studio in the city in December. He is working on projects that explore potential uses for various waste materials from factories in Europe and Japan.

Furniture made from waste tiles by Tsuyoshi Hayashi

"My biggest wish is to collaborate with factories in each country and apply my design principle to propose unique value and locality of waste material," said Hayashi.

Furniture made from waste tiles by Tsuyoshi Hayashi

The Kawara project was exhibited as part of the [D3] Design Talents exhibition at imm cologne.

This year's [D3] Contest was won by a storage rail based on a traditional Shaker-style peg board. Imm cologne continues until Sunday at the Koelnmesse exhibition centre.

  • George

    Seems like the seat needs a “proper” support.
    The picture shows the fragile nature of the tile.

    • Joe

      I’ve tried it in real, believe me it’s really strong (I’m about 90 kgs)

  • jens wolff

    I like the joinery.

  • linked1

    That edge under your knees must be sharp. A broken glazed tile has an almost razor sharp edge. Grinding the edge might help but typically that edge is very brittle.

  • Evan

    Would be great to see a shot of them in use with someone sitting on one of them.

  • linked1

    Okay smartypants, what do you do with that sharp edge?

  • Nick Simpson

    These look great, especially with the range of colour. Nice joinery too. They don’t look like something that would be comfortable to sit on for two long though, maybe they’re more for perching on for shorter periods.

    Maybe the designer could sell some to Boyzone / Westlife, for them to perch on before the key change / stand up trick they do in every song?