Hayo Gebauer's Moiré Mirror rotates
to reveal changing patterns

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Project Moire Mirror by Hayo Gebauer

A light source behind this mirror by graduate designer Hayo Gebauer is revealed through patterns on rotating disks that create a moiré effect.

Project Moire Mirror by Hayo Gebauer

A moiré effect is created by overlaying two identical patterns on parallel transparent surfaces. Displacing or rotating either surface creates a new pattern not visible in either layer alone.



Hayo Gebauer's Moiré Mirror features two disks made from one-way mirror glass with a patterned lightproof film on the reverse.

Project Moire Mirror by Hayo Gebauer

These are mounted on a steel frame in front of two concentric circular neon tubes.

Project Moire Mirror by Hayo Gebauer

The mirror provides a simple reflection until the back disk is rotated, activating the moiré effect and revealing the light behind.

Project Moire Mirror by Hayo Gebauer

"Moiré appealed to me because you can create patterns that exist in your vision, but aren't really there," Gebauer told Dezeen.

Project Moire Mirror by Hayo Gebauer

"I was looking for ways to control the light through the mirror. I thought about many approaches, like using sand or dust particles to darken the backside of the mirror, but the moiré effect seemed like an interesting interactive approach."

Project Moire Mirror by Hayo Gebauer

As Gebauer's graduation project, the mirror was shown at the Braunschweig University of Arts' annual Open Studios Exhibition.

Project Moire Mirror by Hayo Gebauer

"People played with the effect and started taking pictures of themselves," said the designer. "That was more than I could have hoped for. I was happy to see people of all ages spinning the wheel to see the effect on their reflection."

Gebauer studied industrial design and communication design at the institution and has also created a lamp that falls over when it is switched off.