ODDA's multifunctional modules combine
bedrooms, kitchens and bathrooms in one unit

| 10 comments

Porto studio ODDA has renovated two 19th-century buildings in the city to create apartments that contain monolithic freestanding units housing the kitchens, beds, bathrooms and other furniture (+ slideshow).

LOIOS Recovery Project in Porto by ODDA

ODDA was asked to oversee the transformation of two partially occupied but neglected buildings in central Porto into 18 studios for tourists and students, as well as reviving the retail units on the ground floor.



LOIOS Recovery Project in Porto by ODDA

The modular furniture proposed by the architects for the interior of the LOIOS development is intended as a strategic solution to the larger issue of disused properties in the city, which could be repurposed quickly and affordably by inserting similar prefabricated units.

LOIOS Recovery Project in Porto by ODDA

"In downtown Porto there are a huge number of buildings with the same dimensions and framework," architect Diogo Brito told Dezeen, "so it is somehow useful that for the same condition we could find a response that addresses the changing needs of clients and buyers' preferences, but also achieves some construction rationalisation and cost efficiency."

LOIOS Recovery Project in Porto by ODDA

The modules can be fabricated to incorporate different functional elements, and can be mounted individually or in groups depending on the space available and the number of services required.

"The units are made of a light steel structure as the inner skeleton, cement fiber board panels and fiber glass planels on the interior, and on the module´s perforated envelope Valcromat – a material which combines the natural features of wood with the brightness of colour," explained Brito.

LOIOS Recovery Project in Porto by ODDA

The LOIOS building contains 16 studio apartments spread across five storeys above the ground floor retail units. A single module in each houses all of the necessary facilities including a bed, office, bathroom, kitchenette and storage space.

LOIOS Recovery Project in Porto by ODDA

In addition, a pair of double-height duplex units accommodate two of the modules, stacked one above the other, with the higher box resting on a structural beam that crosses the space.

LOIOS Recovery Project in Porto by ODDA

The standard modules incorporate a bed that slides out from the base, with a desk on a raised platform accessed by swinging out a set of steps also built into the base.

LOIOS Recovery Project in Porto by ODDA

A kitchenette on one side is revealed by pulling aside two cupboard-like doors, while a bathroom containing a shower, toilet and washbasin is hidden behind a door set into the other side.

LOIOS Recovery Project in Porto by ODDA

The exterior of the boxes is covered with a perforated pattern based on painted tiles found in some of the city's historic buildings.

LOIOS Recovery Project in Porto by ODDA

"As the apartments will be targeted to tourists and seasonal foreign students, the client urged us to create something inside that could evoke some historic symbol of the city in an unique way," Brito explained.

LOIOS Recovery Project in Porto by ODDA

Images of the pattern were rasterised and applied to the surfaces as a series of recessed dots and holes, which enable parts of the pattern to glow when illuminated from within.

LOIOS Recovery Project in Porto by ODDA

"The perforated technique allowed us to imprint the rasterised images but also to give some transparency to the module so it functions as a grand chandelier in the night," Brito added.

LOIOS Recovery Project in Porto by ODDA

As part of the renovation, original stone details on the exterior of the two buildings were cleaned, the rear facades were re-painted and existing tiles on the frontages were replaced.

LOIOS Recovery Project in Porto by ODDA

Traditional methods and materials were employed throughout the renovation, including vegetable-based paints used on the rear facade and varnishes with mineral pigments applied to interior details, including doors, stairs and handrails.

LOIOS Recovery Project in Porto by ODDA

ODDA previously operated under the name OODA and was responsible for the renovation of another 19th-century building in the city into apartments, with interiors featuring chipboard surfaces and folded metal staircases. In another project, the studio installed a net for sitting on above a staircase in a Porto apartment.

LOIOS Recovery Project in Porto by ODDA
Concept diagram – click for larger image
LOIOS Recovery Project in Porto by ODDA
Concept diagram – click for larger image
LOIOS Recovery Project in Porto by ODDA
Sectional diagram – click for larger image
LOIOS Recovery Project in Porto by ODDA
Module plans, sections and elevation – click for larger image

 

LOIOS Recovery Project in Porto by ODDA
Floor plans – click for larger image
LOIOS Recovery Project in Porto by ODDA
Floor plan showing studio apartments and a double-height duplex
  • chris

    Very functional but they look like 1960’s computers in a room.

  • chris

    Functional but looks like 1960s computer in a room.

  • david

    I think it’s a very interesting idea. It would be a nice application for hotels. I don’t really believe in the domestic application it currently enjoys.

  • villainesta

    The bundling of wet services at one location has appeal as cost effectiveness, but the rather ominous aspect of the module due to colour and paucity of variety in colour and texture, I would find disheartening.

  • Kim

    “A material which combines the natural features of wood with the brightness of colour”. Right.

  • Miranda Babbitt

    Sure, it’s functional. But it looks like they sacrificed virtually all creativity in the aesthetics of the design. It’s that material that creeps me out: I feel like it could come alive.

  • Concerned Citizen

    I agree with the other comments about the dreadful appearance of the unit. Some book and butt matched wood veneers would take it a long way toward visual appeal. Or even some better colours.

    Aesthetics aside, the unit is wholly unusable by the disabled, even the temporarily disabled.

  • mik

    This is perfect for architects. You can have a home and an office. It’s not really a home. It’s more than that. It’s like comparing a knife to a Swiss knife. There is nothing to do. Very good project. Keep it up OODA.

  • This is nothing new. I implemented this idea in a 56 apartment condominium in NYC almost 10 years ago:

    http://www.duckandshed.com/portfolio-item/pod-living-at-the-jade/

    Enjoy with care :-)

  • Someone

    I agree with David. As a hotel, I would love to stay there for a night, but as a home, no way.

    At first, I thought that it was going to be one of the homes which transform, but these are just panels which open and close.