Dezeen's top five collections from London College of Fashion MA Womenswear 2016

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Dezeen design editor Dan Howarth's selection of the best graduate collections from London College of Fashion's MA Womenswear this year includes dresses made using PVC flooring and skirts constructed from plywood.

London College of Fashion MA Womenswear 2016
Yawen Qian

In the wood-panelled surrounds of the Royal College of Surgeons, London College of Fashion's (LCF) 2016 womenswear show took place last night on the eve of London Fashion Week.

London College of Fashion MA Womenswear 2016
Sui Yiru

"Our MA Womenswear course continues from strength to strength and by holding our LCFMA16 show ahead of LFW it gives us the opportunity to profile the graduate's collections at a time when the fashion industry is looking to London," said LCF head Frances Corner.

London College of Fashion MA Womenswear 2016
Desirée Slabik

Ten designers were selected from this year's crop of graduates by an industry panel to present in the catwalk show, which was accompanied by a live music performance from Haelos.

Here's our pick of the top five collections from the show:


Zhixian Wang

London College of Fashion MA Womenswear 2016

Padded pillowy forms were draped over the body and tied into bows in Zhixian Wang's collection, which was influenced by Taiwanese poet and writer Sanmao's Stories of the Sahara.

London College of Fashion MA Womenswear 2016

"She has a really romantic but sad love story," Wang told Dezeen." She met her true love in the Sahara and he became her husband, but he died six months later."

London College of Fashion MA Womenswear 2016

Beginning all-white, the parade of garments gradually included more orange until the final outfits shown were fully coloured, a progression intended to reflect Sanmao's story. A couple of models also carried huge spherical balloons.


Yawen Qian

London College of Fashion MA Womenswear 2016

Named Sick, Yawen Qian's collection featured garments based on hospital gowns and clothing for disabled people.

London College of Fashion MA Womenswear 2016

"My inspiration comes from my parents, who are both doctors," Qian told Dezeen. "Inside, the garments are all white."

London College of Fashion MA Womenswear 2016

Each of the garmets was made from one piece of material, with PVC flooring and memory foam bonded into layers.


Sui Yiru

London College of Fashion MA Womenswear 2016

Sui Yiru used thin cherry plywood to form panels, outlines and full skirts for her collection.

London College of Fashion MA Womenswear 2016

"My design idea is just clean, geometric shapes, and the colours are simple black and white mixed with the natural wood," Sui told Dezeen.

London College of Fashion MA Womenswear 2016

The wooden pieces were paired with white and black fabrics, attached using bondweb.


Desirée Slabik

London College of Fashion MA Womenswear 2016

Desirée Slabik stitched fluffy plumes of organza by hand to form voluminous sleeves and trousers for sharp white outfits, as well as entire ensembles.

London College of Fashion MA Womenswear 2016

"My collection develops from a really white architectural look to a really floral, flowerbomb look," Slabik told Dezeen. "Really white to really colourful, and really graphic to really organic."

London College of Fashion MA Womenswear 2016

The ruffled elements were also hand-dyed to create an ombre effect that blended from pink through yellow to white.


Ysabel Lee

London College of Fashion MA Womenswear 2016

Gently undulated squares of material formed hats to accompany Ysabel Lee's dark-coloured collection.

London College of Fashion MA Womenswear 2016

"It's about how western culture impacts eastern," Lee told Dezeen. "The life model we live is currently very box-like, so I focused on that."

London College of Fashion MA Womenswear 2016

Lee used drapery, pleating and double hems to create her clothes, which also featured large yellow stitches to provide extra details. Square buttons and magnets were used to keep the lines as clean as possible.

  • Doubtful Dodger

    Some of these look like the costumes in Star Wars.

  • Architects Anonymous

    I’m not finding much to comment on in this article because I think I actually like the clothing design, even though I’m not sure it will ever make it to the real world, like most modern fashion, as it appears to be too abstract for us simple people too embrace. However, there is some nice boob action on that one chic. Nice.

    • greenish

      Oh my goodness, have a word with yourself.

      • Architects Anonymous

        The truth hurts.

  • RJSigKits

    Surely the whole point of design is to come up with ideas that look great, are practical, and people can actually use in the real world…