Richard Yasmine's Ashkal mirrors slice into geometric bases
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Richard Yasmine's Ashkal mirrors slice into geometric bases

Beirut designer Richard Yasmine has created a collection of extra-thin hand mirrors that slot into bases made from marble and brass (+ slideshow).

Each piece in the range references shapes from the stained glass facade of the Sursock Museum in Beirut, and includes circular, rectangular, triangular and hexagonal vanity mirrors held on slender stems.

Richard Yasmine's Ashkal mirrors slice into geometric bases

Grooves in accompanying bases, which are similarly made in geometric shapes, allow the mirrors to be held in place. The marble and brass of each base contrasts with the polished stainless steel of the mirrors, which are edged in a gold finish.

Richard Yasmine's Ashkal mirrors slice into geometric bases

"The extremely thin hand mirrors figuratively cut a slice of these solid bases, making a rift where it fits inside and giving the image of a surrealistic, oversized, fashionable cutlery set," said Yasmine, who previously created a marble table with phallic brass legs.

The collection is reminiscent of a similarly sculptural range created by Stockholm's Studio EO, which placed glass vases that appeared to be melting on top of bases made from solid wedges of marble.

Richard Yasmine's Ashkal mirrors slice into geometric bases

Yasmine has also recently completed a range of solid marble tables, shaped to resemble oversized nails.

Named Clou – the French word for nail – the circular tabletop is divided by a groove, and rests on a single stem which slots into an accompanying pedestal. The furniture is available in both black and white marble, and bases can be mix-and-matched.

Richard Yasmine's Ashkal mirrors slice into geometric bases

Marble has made an appearance in a number of recent furniture projects, used by Nendo to create a set of leaning tables, and wrapped in brass by Bethan Gray, also for a table collection.

The Ashkal collection is available from the Sursock Museum store.

Photography is by BizarreBeirut.