Richard Yasmine's Glory Holes tables has brass dildos for legs

Richard Yasmine's Glory Holes table has brass dildos for legs

Beirut product designer Richard Yasmine has created a marble and brass side table with removable phallic legs for "kinky-minded people".

Glory holes by Richard Yasmine

The Glory Holes table features a solid marble top that rests on eight handmade, turned and polished brass supports in various widths and lengths, and a circular metal base.

Glory holes by Richard Yasmine

The designer suggests the piece can be used as a low table, a sculptural piece, or a base for a larger table top if turned upside down.

"Not to mention the very easy removable multi-sized phallic shaped brass elements for kinky-minded people," added Yasmine.

Glory holes by Richard Yasmine

The legs of the table can be rearranged as needed to decrease or increase the height of the top, and also serve as in-built flower vases. The metal base can additionally be used as a surface, with the tips of the brass legs resting in pre-drilled holes.

Glory holes by Richard Yasmine

"Glory Holes is more than just an ordinary table," Yasmine told Dezeen. "Usually I like to create multifunctional design pieces."

Glory holes by Richard Yasmine

"I love to work with solid materials such as wood and natural stones, all kinds of metal and marble, always seeking to integrate the Middle Eastern spirit in the recipe of each of my products," he added.

"I see Glory Holes as a glamorous object conceived as a piece of jewellery projecting a new dimension in the world of home accessories."

Glory holes by Richard Yasmine

He's not the first to combine sex toys and furniture. Design Academy Eindhoven graduate Bastiaan Buijs raised a stir in the Dezeen comments section with his fleshlight-cum-furniture piece, which could be mounted like a vaulting horse.

Glory holes by Richard Yasmine

Lebanese designer Marc Dibeh also hid a sex toy in his Love the Bird lamp, which featured a light switch that doubled up as a dildo.

The Glory Holes table was originally designed for an exhibition curated by SMOgallery for Beirut Design Week 2015, which ran from 1 to 7 June.