Bert & May and Darkroom collaborate on geometric-patterned tile

London Design Festival 2016: Bert & May has partnered with London design label Darkroom to create a range of handmade tiles featuring simple geometric shapes (+ slideshow).

Based around Darkroom's signature use of graphic forms, the Split Shift collection features three tile designs.

Bert & May collaborates with Darkroom to create geometric tiles

The hand-poured ceramic tiles are patterned with half circles, rectangles and right-angled triangles.

The shapes can be matched to their corresponding halves to create a structured, uniform pattern. Alternatively, they can be placed randomly to create an abstract look.

Bert & May collaborates with Darkroom to create geometric tiles

"The collaboration with Darkroom first came about in 2015 with the building of the Bert & May barge, when we invited Darkroom to produce a series of wall mounted plates as an art installation," said Bert & May founder Lee Thornley.

"The beautiful, oversized plates, complete with the signature Darkroom geometric shapes, were the perfect addition to the design-focused interior of the barge and formed the inspiration for the new Darkroom tiles and fabrics we are launching this September."

Bert & May collaborates with Darkroom to create geometric tiles

The tiles are coloured with natural pigments and created using a traditional manufacturing process.

Bert & May's new collection will also include a series of 12 fabrics produced in Scotland, some of which feature screen-printed patterns and some of which are plain.

During the London Design Festival, the new collection will be presented at an installation inside the company's Vyner Street showroom, and also on Bert & May barge, which will be redecorated to reflect the collaboration.

Bert & May collaborates with Darkroom to create geometric tiles

The new fabrics will be used to create blinds, curtains and bedlinen, as well as to upholster furniture pieces. The tiles will feature in the bathroom.

London Design Festival takes place from 17 to 25 September 2016. Other installations across the capital include plant-filled pavilions by Asif Khan and a giant smile made from cross-laminated tulipwood by Alison Brooks.