Pools of metal and glass form Vincenzo De Cotiis' Baroquisme furniture
Baroquisme by Vincenzo De Cotiis

Pools of metal and glass form Vincenzo De Cotiis' Baroquisme furniture

Surfaces found in this furniture series by Italian designer Vincenzo De Cotiis, shown at New York's Carpenters Workshop Gallery, could be mistaken for still being in a liquid state.

The Baroquisme collection includes 15 limited-edition and one-of-a-kind pieces, including tables, seating, storage and lighting.

Baroquisme by Vincenzo De Cotiis

De Cotiis designed each as an ode to Italian Baroque – an art movement that spanned from the late 16th century to the early 18th century, which is known for its decorative and experimental style.

Providing a contemporary interpretation, his furniture items pair luxurious materials like marble, silvered cast brass and Murano glass with industrial components like fibreglass.

Baroquisme by Vincenzo De Cotiis

"In the series, De Cotiis emphasises decoration vis-à-vis an architectural sensibility, creating a contemporary twist of shapes and functions by pairing precious noble materials... steeped in rich artistic heritage with unexpected contemporary materials," said a statement from Carpenters Workshop Gallery.

Many of the designs comprise discs of metal and glass, layered onto each other to form irregular surfaces for table tops and scone shades. The glass – crafted by artisans in Murano, Venice – is infused with subtle hints of colour that spreads through the transparent material and sets in a different way every time.

Baroquisme by Vincenzo De Cotiis

These unique pool-shaped pieces, which look as if they are still in a molten state, are combined with the treated metal sections that appear equally fluid.

As well as tables and lamps, a set is used to form a circular door for a large wall-mounted cabinet. Other items pair the glass with colourful marble, creating coffee table tops of various sizes.

Baroquisme by Vincenzo De Cotiis

"The organic gestures of Baroquisme are the result of a long design process in order to obtain the shapes I had in my mind," said De Cotiis in the gallery's statement.

A large dining table was created specifically for the New York exhibition. It is supported by two heavy marble legs, carved to angle inward and be hollowed inside.

A pair of rippled screens, made from thin slices of marble and sheets of patinated metal attached to fibreglass supports, were also displayed. The fibreglass was repurposed from scrap, and recut to the desired form.

"Often, I already have in mind what kind of material I want to use," said the designer, who originally trained as an architect in Milan, and started his studio in the city in 1997.

Baroquisme by Vincenzo De Cotiis

"Sometimes it's precisely the material itself that modifies or enriches the work during the construction process, leading to surprising results."

The Baroquisme exhibition – De Cotiis' second in the US – took place 26 April to 23 June 2018 at Carpenters Workshop Gallery, 693 Fifth Avenue, New York.

Baroquisme by Vincenzo De Cotiis

The gallery was set up in London's Chelsea by Julien Lombrail and Loic Le Gaillard in 2006, before moving to Mayfair in 2008 then opening a space in Le Marais, Paris, in 2011.

The New York outpost was created in 2015, and has since hosted exhibitions by contemporary artists and designers including Wonmin Park, Vincent Dubourg and Maarten Baas.

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Baroquisme by Vincenzo De Cotiis
Baroquisme by Vincenzo De Cotiis
Baroquisme by Vincenzo De Cotiis
Baroquisme by Vincenzo De Cotiis
Baroquisme by Vincenzo De Cotiis
Baroquisme by Vincenzo De Cotiis
Baroquisme by Vincenzo De Cotiis
Baroquisme by Vincenzo De Cotiis
Baroquisme by Vincenzo De Cotiis
Baroquisme by Vincenzo De Cotiis
Baroquisme by Vincenzo De Cotiis
Baroquisme by Vincenzo De Cotiis
Baroquisme by Vincenzo De Cotiis