Japanese restaurant combines minimal details and unfinished surfaces
Tags:

Search results:

Hono Izakaya by Charlène Bourgeois

Japanese restaurant in Quebec City combines minimal details and unfinished surfaces

Wood-framed structures create a range of different spaces in Hono Izakaya, a restaurant in Quebec City that was recently refurbished by local designer Charlène Bourgeois.

The minimalist eatery is located on St-Joseph Street, the main axis of an up-and-coming neighbourhood of the same name.

Hono Izakaya by Charlène Bourgeois

The space underwent a thorough renovation, but Bourgeois sought to preserve certain elements that already characterised the space.

For example, a masonry wall that was previously hidden is now exposed and runs along the length of the restaurant.

Hono Izakaya by Charlène Bourgeois

"The stone wall, which was covered by decorative panels with a brick motif, shows signs of the building's past and tells a story about the place," Bourgeois told Dezeen.

A few short steps divide the longitudinal floor plan in two – another feature that the designer took advantage of during the renovation.

Hono Izakaya by Charlène Bourgeois

"The steps that lead up to the bar and kitchen area create a threshold that leads to a more intimate space," she said. The back areas have a lower ceiling height, which the designer says creates a more cosy ambience.

Throughout the eatery, different volumes are framed by simple structures built from wooden studs. At the front, the main seating area is contained within such a volume.

Further back, the bar is also delineated as a separate area. The open kitchen has a row of seats along the front, and is also contained within a similar wooden structure.

"The wooden structures allow the restaurant to be divided into subspaces, which offer different settings to share a meal with family or friends," Bourgeois said.

Hono Izakaya by Charlène Bourgeois

Simple materials throughout the restaurant include white tiles, plywood for built-in furniture, and wooden floorboards. Vintage chairs offer some contrast to the light-hued tones chosen for the renovation.

Hono Izakaya by Charlène Bourgeois

Quebec City is known for its 17th-century architecture and landmarks, but is also home to several interesting contemporary projects. Oak Residence was recently completed by two local firms – Hatem + D and Étienne Bernier Architecte – while Atelier Filz designed custom lighting and furniture for a French-style bistro, also in the St-Joseph neighbourhood.

Photography is by Maxime Brouillet.

Project credits:

Designer: Charlène Bourgeois
Illustrations: Marie-Lise Leclerc
Graphic design: Jonathan Royer

More images and plans

Hono Izakaya by Charlène Bourgeois
Hono Izakaya by Charlène Bourgeois
Section plan
Hono Izakaya by Charlène Bourgeois
Hono Izakaya by Charlène Bourgeois
Hono Izakaya by Charlène Bourgeois
Hono Izakaya by Charlène Bourgeois
Hono Izakaya by Charlène Bourgeois
Hono Izakaya by Charlène Bourgeois