Line Austin by Sean Knibb

Mid-century tower becomes Line Austin hotel with interiors by Sean Knibb

Los Angeles designer Sean Knibb has renovated a mid-century hotel in Austin, adding textured surfaces and pale pink accents to update the guest facilities.

The Line Austin sits on the edge of the Texan capital's downtown area, overlooking the Colorado River and the Congress Avenue bridge – where tourists gather at twilight to watch flocks of bats fly eastward during summer months.

Line Austin by Sean Knibb

The modernist building first opened in 1965 as The Crest Inn, but has been updated by hospitality company Sydell Group as the third in its Line chain, following outposts in LA and DC.

Architect Michael Hsu helped strip the structure back to its mid-century bones, while Knibb was tapped to overhaul the 428 guest rooms and swath of communal spaces, with a brief to capitalise on the location.

Line Austin by Sean Knibb

"Interiors by Los Angeles-based Sean Knibb focus on drawing the surrounding nature in by opening the lobby to lake views, and adding landscaping that blurs the lines between indoors and outdoors," said a statement from the hotel.

In the lobby and lounge, a series of fireplaces create focal points for seating areas. Each hearth is made from a different material, rough cement, brushed copper, wood and marble among the surrounds.

Line Austin by Sean Knibb

To complement the muted hues, some walls are painted pale pink and a handful of furniture pieces are upholstered in soft blue.

These tones – along with sage green – are echoed in the fabrics used in meeting rooms and event spaces, which total 20,000 square feet (1,860 square metres) when combining indoor and outdoor areas.

Line Austin by Sean Knibb

Back in the reception area, plants are also used to create a welcoming atmosphere. A cafe serves tea and coffee, and an adjacent store carries branded merchandise.

The Arlo Grey restaurant opened with the hotel in June 2018, serving French-Italian cuisine made from local ingredients.

Line Austin by Sean Knibb

The space continues the colour and material palette from the lobby, with the addition of blackened wood that forms the central bar.

The bedrooms take advantage of the building's large windows, which stretch floor to ceiling and are curved at their top corners.

Facing either the city or the river, the rooms feature exposed concrete columns and sandblasted plywood headboards. Furniture is kept to the minimum to create more space and a contemporary feel.

"The guest rooms balance old and new elements with a minimalist design that focuses on the room's essentials: the bed, desk, and chair," said the hotel's statement.

Line Austin by Sean Knibb

Works by local artists are displayed throughout the hotel, while the city's live music scene is supported through regular performances.

Guests also have access to an outdoor terrace and infinity pool, where drinks and snacks are served to those lounging under plaid-patterned parasols.

Line Austin by Sean Knibb

A rooftop bar and a riverside burger joint are both set to open later this year.

Austin is brimming with places to eat and stay. Other recently completed options for travellers include Native Hostel that is meant to serve as an alternative to pricey boutique hotels, and the Austin Motel that has received a 1950s makeover to take it back to its roots.

Line Austin by Sean Knibb

Meanwhile, among new dining spots are Hank's, with "minimalist desert modern" interiors, and ATX Cocina, which features a dramatic, curved wooden ceiling.

Photography is by Chase Daniel.

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Line Austin by Sean Knibb
Line Austin by Sean Knibb
Line Austin by Sean Knibb
Line Austin by Sean Knibb
Line Austin by Sean Knibb
Line Austin by Sean Knibb
Line Austin by Sean Knibb