Plakbanterie by Johan Bruninx

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Designer Johan Bruninx renews old furniture by covering it with paper packaging tape in intricate patterns.

The tape is used to cover scratches and dents in the surface and restore value to the discarded objects.

The patterns created with the tape are reminiscent of traditional wooden marquetry techniques, where thin veneers are used to cover a surface with an inlaid pattern. From a distance, the paper tape takes on the appearance of wood.

Bruninx showed the project at the Design Academy Eindhoven graduation show 2007, held during Dutch Design Week. See all our stories from Dutch Design Week 2007.

The following text is from Johan Bruninx:

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Paperskin - Plakbanterie

“It’s not what you are that counts, it’s what they think you are!”

The objective was to upgrade the value of old material by using brown eco tape in a crafty way, similar to the art of marqueterie.

By creating patterns with the tape one gets an aesthetic quality and a change of identity. We move from functional to ornamental values. From low to high, from packaging to an haute couture skin.

Because of the association with marquetry the paper skin becomes like wood… the ultimate disguise!

Ceci n’est pas du bois!

Concealing cracks, dents and scratches, a second skin of ordinary brown sticky tape gives old furniture a new identity. Saving old discriminated furniture by the use of smart camouflage ads to future trends in the recycling industry. Recycling becomes art!

  • mk

    the delicacy of the pattern is good but when talking about upgrading / recycling old furniture seems kinda ironic to use tulips.. what about what you actually find on the street

  • I am sorry

    You might wanna check out the Jeesus Furniture #1 by http://www.com-pa-ny.com (inside the product folder). It is old furniture rescued with superdurable duck tape.

  • http://www.hands.be Heronimus Anonimus

    I love the fact that recycling becomes an art. We will need to approach the future in such a way. Producing less new stuff and rediscovering the old.