VTOL by Kram/Weisshaar

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VTOL - Vertical Take Off and Landing, an installation by designers Kram/Weisshaar, went on show outside the Liechtenstein Museum in Vienna this month.

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The 1.3cm thick concrete installation is part of Vienna Design Week, which runs until 12th October. Photography courtesy of Ditz Fejer.

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The following is from Kram/Weisshaar:

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At the invitation of the Vienna Design Week, Clemens Weisshaar and Reed Kram have designed, developed and implemented this large-scale public installation in close collaboration with Wolfgang Rieder and his company Rieder Smart Elements.

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A twisting, glass fibre-reinforced concrete surface – 100 m2 in size and only 13 mm thick – appears to float weightlessly above the ground on a mirrored pedestal. VTOL is shaped with the aid of a set of software tools especially developed by the designers.

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Custom programming was introduced to allow for the flexible and rapid manufacturing of unique parametric concrete objects.In this regard it can be seen as the successor of their VENDÔME project introduced several months prior at Design Miami/ Basel 2008.

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In both cases the intelligent combination of the given static properties of concrete with the dynamic potential of process-oriented software forms the central theme for the project.

VTOL is constructed using an innovative glass fibre-reinforced concrete called fibreC. The material can be thought of as a concrete skin, exhibiting the best properties of both glass fibre and concrete.

The material is constructed from purely mineral raw materials, environmentally-friendly, solid and durable, malleable and easy to control, thin-walled and extremely light.

| 14 comments

Posted on Wednesday, October 8th, 2008 at 12:19 am by Rob Ong. See our copyright policy. Before commenting, please read our comments policy.

  • boring

    BIG WORDS BIG WORDS….the form is pretty simple..easy Rhino stuff..

    “In both cases the intelligent combination of the given static properties of concrete with the dynamic potential of process-oriented software forms the central theme for the project”.

    seemingly intelligent words but actually say nothing..no process shown as well.. BIG and BORING

  • B

    you need software for that?

  • http://miasto-masa-maszyna.blogspot.com miasto-maßa-maszyna

    Reminds me a main element of scenography to Angelin Preljocaj’s / Stravinski’s “Rite of Spring” ;-)

  • Simple

    Its nice use of materials but seriously can be done easily and by analog way in countries such as india and china and other parts of asia…

    its much ado about nothing but the idea is simple and should have kept the words that way…

  • julius von waldstein

    Having been at the Vienna Design Week opening this installation is actually very very beautiful – the skin really floats, the mirrors let the floor continue under the installation.

  • hank crane

    Would be interesting to see this “custom made” software in action – the same with the vendome – never saw any prove of this software…

  • rrrrrrr

    it floats, kinda… if you squint a lot.

    floaty wackness, whatever will they think of next?

  • designwank

    i’ve nerver seen any of the promoted software in any of the projects which were software driven really working. this is basic rhino-freeform-tutorial
    and material is not special at all. by the way: fibre-concrete excists for about 30 years.
    so, why don’t you just say it’s a sculpture, instead of talking pseudo-intellectual about which is not…?

  • bauster

    the thing really is pretty boring.. not even a real 3d form.
    and it does not look floating at all..
    have been at the design week opening and thought that’s not even a new installation.
    but still, it’s good for kids to do some scating on it.

  • jake

    bauster, that’s the first thing I thought of. That would be amazing to skate on.

  • http://www.bevhisey.com Bev Hisey

    My first reaction…..Great….Nani Marquina has made a giant concrete version of her flying carpet.

    I am surprised that these people make the claim they have “designed” this object

  • julius von waldstein

    We did see the software in action in Vienna – negotiating beautifully the limits of the bending process in the factory – and lots of kids skating. You guys should stop talking and get busy with some work.

  • http://www.antigravitypress.com MC

    Hmmm, I don’t see a “No skateboarding” sign.

  • Liz

    I see the installation of this sculpture floating above a pool, and if possible, water flowing over it and falling from the lower parts in thin sheets back into the larger body of water. If the sculpture could be (or is?) translucent, then lighting under it for evening would be enchanting.