Zipte Link by Michael Young

| 8 comments

Hong Kong-based British designer Michael Young presents a collection of furniture made of modular aluminium parts in Vienna this month as part of Vienna Design Week.

Called Zipte Link, each element consists of an extruded bar with two kinks and a cross-shaped section.

These can be joined with metal components to make bases for glass table tops or room dividers.

Zipte is on show as part of an exhibition at retailers designfunktion called Michael Young - Works in China, showcasing projects Young has completed since moving to Hong Kong three years ago.

Vienna Design Week continues until 11 October.

Here's some more information from Michael Young:

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Michael Young with “Works in China” at designfunktion

From October 1st to 11th, the third VIENNA DESIGN WEEK attracts anew stars of the international design scene as well as promising newcomers. The furnishing shop “designfunktion” shows Michael Young’s latest products for the first time outside of Asia.

Michael Young’s exhibition named ‘Works in China’ shows products that have been developed during his time in Hong Kong including the Zipte Link Installation, which was premiered during the Hong Kong International Art Fair 2009.

His exhibition has a very special link to VIENNA DESIGN WEEK’s approach.

“Zipte Link” is not only an intelligent hightech product, but as an artful installation also represents the connection of modern design and technical abilities of the local industry, in this case Chinese.

Rising from the momentum of collaboration with Chinese industrialists, the Zipte Link System captures the strengthening ties between local industry and design, and exemplifies the skills of Asia industry and manufacturing.

Young sees the work not as Design Art but as Industrial Art where some of the highest levels of manufacturing have been employed to experiment with typologies and the creative relationships between individual and industry.

Vienna is the first stop outside of Asia, where Michael Young’s design pieces is being displayed from 1st - 11th October 2009.

| 8 comments

Posted on Thursday, October 8th, 2009 at 11:21 am by . See our copyright policy. Before commenting, please read our comments policy.

  • http://www.the-fake-sartorialist.blogspot.com The Fake Sartorialst

    The extrusion shape looks good but doesn’t translate perfectly from a distance. It’s a bit too bling for my liking.

  • ste

    i really like the parts… the form and the finish… but for me they only work as objects or as a wall system… the table is really annoying me

  • http://www.adymills.co.uk ady mills

    Designers sometimes seem to get so successful that some of their work does become very questionable to me, but seems to be un challenged by the media. I dont like to be over critical but this does not do much for me i'm afraid. I know aluminium is 100% recylable but the energy used to manipulate it to create a product needs to be put into the sustainable loop, and the energy used to produce these frames must consume heavily.

  • http://jamiejoseffry.tumblr.com JJF

    the aluminum extrusions are cool, i like them but im much more about the wooden chair!

  • MY

    Michael, is this the result of late drinking in Sense99?

  • W

    The form is related to the lamp design.. which i like. Does it use the same mould?

  • D

    Good : ) I agree it works best at the largest scale as a wall. I would prefer it scaled down so you could make the table support out of 50 primitives instead of 10 etc
    It is lovely as a field condition.
    The colors suck mixed. As a single tone of silver or gold or black it works nicely. I would probably leave it at white only, black only, or silver only and it would be most elegant.

  • http://www.atelierpunkt.com atelier punkt

    Very elegant it is great !