Roslyn Street Bar and Restaurant by
Durbach Block Architects

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Roslyn Street Bar and Restaurant by Durbach Block Architects

Australian studio Durbach Block Architects have completed a wedge-shaped building in Sydney, Australia, that appears to have been pinched in at the top.

Roslyn Street Bar and Restaurant by Durbach Block Architects

The four storey building on Roslyn street features a façade with both glossy and matte, white and buff mosaic tiles broken up with rows of uneven black windows that jut out of the surface.

Roslyn Street Bar and Restaurant by Durbach Block Architects

The top floor is partially uncovered, with a triangular roof garden surrounded by curved walls and steel window frames.

The building houses a restaurant on the ground floor, a bar on the first floor and commercial units on the top two floors.

Roslyn Street Bar and Restaurant by Durbach Block Architects

Photographs are by Peter Bennetts unless otherwise stated.

Roslyn Street Bar and Restaurant by Durbach Block Architects

Above photograph is by Anthony Browell.

Here's some more information from the architects:


5-9 Roslyn Street Potts Point is a triangular shaped site, less than 200m2 in size. The rounded end looks directly onto a small public space.

Roslyn Street Bar and Restaurant by Durbach Block Architects

Above photograph is by Anthony Browell.

The shape of the site exaggerates perspective, the tiny footprint amplifies the perception of height.


We wanted the building to sit easily in its place, to recognise the architectural traits of its neighbours.

Roslyn Street Bar and Restaurant by Durbach Block Architects

Above photograph is by Neil Durbach.

We also wanted to take a new view of the thick masonry walls, small detailed windows and overhanging cornices typical of the area.

Roslyn Street Bar and Restaurant by Durbach Block Architects

Above photograph is by Anthony Browell.

The cornice is exaggerated to overhang the street, to suggest a room. The fine steel lined windows are slightly offset and casually misaligned.

Roslyn Street Bar and Restaurant by Durbach Block Architects

Above photograph is by Anthony Browell.

The awning splits to mark individual entry points on the street.

Roslyn Street Bar and Restaurant by Durbach Block Architects

Above photograph is by Neil Durbach.

On the street, it seems an ephemeral version of the neighbourhood buildings, the rhythm held by the openings as the wall recedes.

Then, at the corner the building shifts to being strongly surfaced, curving in two directions, becoming a peninsular of moulded light.

Roslyn Street Bar and Restaurant by Durbach Block Architects

The surface of crackled tiles, a mixture of gloss and matte, white and biscuit, reflect and refract the surroundings.

Roslyn Street Bar and Restaurant by Durbach Block Architects

Above photograph is by Anthony Browell.

An exotic roof top garden of frangipani trees and seasonal plantings is framed in the sky through buckled openings.

Roslyn Street Bar and Restaurant by Durbach Block Architects

Above photograph is by Neil Durbach.

The softly modulated interior of the restaurant accommodates the shifting geometry of the site, uses of the room and its services.

Roslyn Street Bar and Restaurant by Durbach Block Architects

The palette of timber, off white concrete, graded textiles and delicate white furniture gives the room a calm and slight remove from the intensity of its urban setting.

Roslyn Street Bar and Restaurant by Durbach Block Architects

Above photograph is by Neil Durbach.

Program:
 Four levels plus basement service area.
Basement Service: Restaurant Service
Ground Floor: Restaurant

Roslyn Street Bar and Restaurant by Durbach Block Architects

Level 1: Bar with direct street access
Level 2: Commercial
Level 3: Commercial and Roof garden

Energy Efficiency

The building observes the fundamental principles of energy efficiency and good design for a medium scaled city building:

Solid masonry walls provide insulation from outside temperatures, while windows with recessed reveals provide natural light without excessive heat gain.

Roslyn Street Bar and Restaurant by Durbach Block Architects

High floor to ceiling heights admit plenty of solar access in winter, excluding sun in summer and contribute to the volume and efficiency of natural ventilation

Roslyn Street Bar and Restaurant by Durbach Block Architects

Click above for larger image

Opening sections in the windows reduce the reliance of interior spaces on air conditioning , providing floor by floor choice for occupants.

Roslyn Street Bar and Restaurant by Durbach Block Architects

Click above for larger image

A deep street awning on the north side shades the full height glazing of the restaurant

Roof garden provides insulation and contributes to the greening (and bird life!) of Kings Cross

Roslyn Street Bar and Restaurant by Durbach Block Architects

Click above for larger image


See also:

.

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Posted on Friday, July 9th, 2010 at 1:00 am by Catherine Warmann. See our copyright policy. Before commenting, please read our comments policy.

  • kolohe

    i really like this one.

  • Abhi

    Great work !
    Has traces of Gaudi in fine details.

  • Tamara Arveladze

    I have not seen yet so refined architectural forms ….I really love it..

  • Diego

    Durbach block Architects – this building is simply Outstanding !! Love love the mosaics, colour, texture, materials & the fine detail!

    Stunning, Superb & Sexy!!

  • edward

    Very find bit of work that brings distinction to the neighborhood

  • Dev Anand Balloo

    Original,Eye catching ,superb detailing ….
    and simply Marvellous.

  • J0p2

    me like

  • http://francoisbeydoun.blogspot.com Francois Beydoun

    A nice nod to the architectural form, just a little bit not to
    fall into a caricature and enough to make from this angle, (often difficult
    to construct), a beautiful and elegant building.
    This also “How to be creative” BRAVO !

    François beydoun

  • http://www.bg-studio.com Marin

    Realy great work!!! Very nice details…

  • Tine Verheyen

    A thing of beauty is a joy forever! Exquisite!

  • DAVID

    I have to say i really like this. Telling from the first picture on the Start-Up-Page I thought “Just another fun architecture”. But the proportions, the mix of materials and the overall quality is very impressive. Good one!

  • Jess M.

    gaudi meets gehry

  • W.A.J.Koenitz

    Wow! Congratulation for that great piece of architecture. Lets bring the emotion back to international Design… The “men” as main client is back again. Great!

  • W.A.J.Koenitz

    Wow! Congratulation for this great piece of architecture. Lets bring the emotion back to international Design… The “men” as main client is back again. Great!

  • Redfern

    Great project.
    It really shows how fantastic a ceramic tile finish can be

  • http://deleted champs negi

    nice design with good material.

  • Sven

    or rather, Gaudi meets Loos

  • nico

    !!!! This post is really great. I love projects like this: narrow sites in contextually rich settings that really respond to a need for specific program while still making everything seem spacious. Having not actually been there I can only speculate based on the photos and plan, but the spaces look like they work nicely. The detailing and outer facade treatment is superb. The steel window frames (especially the curved ones), cleans lines, and curved upper floor lend a contemporary touch to a language that otherwise remains classic. I would love to work on a project like this.

  • grapes

    Love it, small homage to gaudi

  • grapes

    which is never a bad thing AT ALL.

  • damfak

    Love it!!!! Love it!!!! Love it!!!! Love it!!!! The little details, everything in this building is perfect… looks a bit like Gaudi, and Hundertwasser but with a contempoary look.

  • angry catalan

    The Calatrava-like use of trencadís says they haven’t understood much about Gaudí. Most worringly, it says they haven’t understood what is easy to understand about his buildings. Still it’s not bad, it’s a pretty building and it doesn’t do a bad job of fitting in what looks like a difficult place. Although the bent cornice looks silly.

    Also, you don’t casually misalign windows. If your elevations are boring no matter what you do that’s because your plans are banal, and that’s what you should work on. But I think the guys who did this already knew that…

    So my opinion is that in some aspects it’s very good and in some others it’s just appalling, but of course I’m judging from a section which says nothing, a ground floor plan and little interior pictures, so…

  • http://www.christianharrup.com christian

    There was a bit of spat locally about demolishing some old and rather uninteresting buildings on the site this building now stands on. But seeing it in reality its a wonderful beautifully detailed and welcome addition to this part of Sydney. The awning and curved glass corner is really rather special.

  • Mr G Van String

    true , one can ‘ t help thinking Gehry and Gaudi , and even , looking at the windows , Dali ( the clocks )…
    a splendid building .

  • http://squidz-bark.blogspot.com/ squidly

    For others, you all need to check out this firm’s site. Their work is excellent across the board, and this project is no exception. Their talent for mixing the orthogonal with curved, sensuous shapes reminds me of Corbusier, and is so lacking in todays architecture.

  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/robmuch Rob

    I love the look of this building, our own little bit of Gaudi (inspired) Architecture here in Sydney! I went and saw the building and took some photographs of it today after reading this story and have just posted them on my Flickr, so have a look if you would like!

  • http://butlerbyrne.com gareth

    This is one of those rare building that you would love to get up close and personal with. Its apparent simplicity makes it very beautiful indeed!

  • Sam

    I live within a few minutes walk from this place and it is a really well detailed building. The whole project has been very well considered. The mosaic facade is really a one-off in Sydney and it responds beautifully to the light. Lets hope that the North Bondi Surf Club can get the funding it needs because i’m sure that when that is completed it will be an even more impressive scheme.

  • bozo

    The only problem is they ripped down the best bar in Sydney to do this, and now it is rather inaccessible.
    We will miss Barons.

  • http://www.eatas.com.au Thiefsie

    I’m just wondering how did they lean over the public space at the top there?

    Fantastic stuff otherwise. I probably would have left the tiles all white but it still looks pretty amazing with the reflective tesselations.

  • edward

    @squidly

    Agree one should check out their web site. Especially check the Queensland Gallery of Modern Art for some interesting watercolor concept sketches. Very much like Steven Holl’s.

  • http://www.allwhitedesign.com Yoav

    caution – buzzword abuse – ‘ephemeral’

  • Candy Hung

    It beaten me,..so cool…i like the top of the building..cause it still catch the “Green” style

  • j

    wonderful shape and texture

  • http://www.arkisens.com edwin rivera

    gaudi refined..

  • yl

    yes ! it reminded me of Gaudi!

  • DrKong

    Amaaazing! Especially the top floor! The curves are modelling a totally surrealistic sight!

  • Nic

    The lovely quality of the light on the tiles shown in the photos also reminds me of another white-tiled building in Sydney…..perhaps there is a slight nod to the Sydney Opera House. Great little project!

  • Aminah

    I guess Gaudi would like it…

  • gem

    agree with bozo. lovely building but why did it have to come at the expense of barrons? the X just ain’t the X anymore. Only the piccolo remains of the trifecta that was deans, barrons and the piccolo!

  • vw

    There are things I like about this project but overall it’s just over done/over designed in my opinion…

    I think it could have been simplified some and it would have been a much more successful project (and the client would have saved some money in the process).

  • Amina

    Beautiful. Durbach Block are the most inspiring architects. Another fine example for their work is the Holman House in Dover Heights, Sydney – just stunning and unusual! http://www.durbachblock.com/pages/projects.php?project_id=27

  • Jetwax

    Wow!! That was my first thought. Superb, conceptually and in finish. Way to go d;-)