Entrance Pavilion Cemetery
by Hansteerds Architectuur

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Entrance Pavilion Cemetery Blankenberge by Hansteerds Architectuur

This pair of pavilions by Dutch studio Hansteerds Architectuur mark the entrance to a cemetery in the city of Blankenberge, Belgium.

Entrance Pavilion Cemetery Blankenberge by Hansteerds Architectuur

The pavilions have a wood-frame construction clad in horizontal slats made of paudak wood.

Entrance Pavilion Cemetery Blankenberge by Hansteerds Architectuur

The pavilion on the left as visitors approach is a public toilet while the other, on the right, forms an office and colonnade with benches overlooking the cemetery.

Entrance Pavilion Cemetery Blankenberge by Hansteerds Architectuur

The interiors are finished in oriented strand board with the doors, cabinets and windows painted black.

Entrance Pavilion Cemetery Blankenberge by Hansteerds Architectuur

All photographs are by Philip Dujardin.

Entrance Pavilion Cemetery Blankenberge by Hansteerds Architectuur

Here's some more form the architect:


Two big houses mark the left and right side of the square in front of the municipal cemetery of the city of Blankenberge in Belgium.

Entrance Pavilion Cemetery Blankenberge by Hansteerds Architectuur

The two characteristic buildings rise high above the curved walls, which separate the cemetery from the square.

Entrance Pavilion Cemetery Blankenberge by Hansteerds Architectuur

The square seems symmetrically, mirroring on the central axis of the graveyard, which stretches from the porch on the square towards the open landscape on the other end of the cemetery; a balanced and distinguished composition.

Entrance Pavilion Cemetery Blankenberge by Hansteerds Architectuur

A new pavilion is build at the entrance of the cemetery by the Dutch architect and urban designer Hans Teerds.

Entrance Pavilion Cemetery Blankenberge by Hansteerds Architectuur

The pavilion houses a small office, a clothing room for employees and public toilets. Teerds split the program into two buildings, which were situated on each side of the axis, in-between the curved walls and the first side-paths.

Entrance Pavilion Cemetery Blankenberge by Hansteerds Architectuur

The space in-between both pavilions is partly covered, on the side of the square and city enclosed by a façade, on the other side separated from the graveyard with a row of columns (which delivers the image of a colonnade and opens the view towards the cemetery) and by a new chestnut tree.

Entrance Pavilion Cemetery Blankenberge by Hansteerds Architectuur

With its benches, the in-between space delivers room to sit, wait and meditate, looking through the columns into the graveyard.

Entrance Pavilion Cemetery Blankenberge by Hansteerds Architectuur

Sunlight delivers nice patterns of the columns on the floor and façade; the flow of the times becomes experienced.

Entrance Pavilion Cemetery Blankenberge by Hansteerds Architectuur

Thus the in-between space marks and intensify the moment of entering by situating the most public area at the very entrance and moreover by evoking the sensibility of the visitors.

Entrance Pavilion Cemetery Blankenberge by Hansteerds Architectuur

Both pavilions are built in wood. The facade is an open casing of horizontal padouk laths, which covers the whole outer form of the pavilions – also covering doors and windows.

Entrance Pavilion Cemetery Blankenberge by Hansteerds Architectuur

On the one hand, this delivers the pavilions an abstract but sculptural appearance, which is the critical mass that is needed to form the entrance.

Entrance Pavilion Cemetery Blankenberge by Hansteerds Architectuur

On the other hand, the pavilion redirects the attention towards the things going on around the entrance, mostly because of its silent character.

Entrance Pavilion Cemetery Blankenberge by Hansteerds Architectuur

The similarity of both buildings strengthens the composition of the two pavilions as a whole, which also clarify the importance of the in-between space.

Entrance Pavilion Cemetery Blankenberge by Hansteerds Architectuur

The wood will change from colour during the first initial years, from deep red towards gray, which helps the pavilions to become rooted in the cemetery, to become one with its surroundings.

Entrance Pavilion Cemetery Blankenberge by Hansteerds Architectuur

The wood also softens the hard forms of the pavilion and the straight lines of the façade, through its organic structure and imperfect form, colour and appearance.

Entrance Pavilion Cemetery Blankenberge by Hansteerds Architectuur

The interior – walls as well as ceiling – is covered with plywood, which combines nicely with the white porcelain of the toilets, rusts free steel accessories, black doors, cabinets and door- and window frames.

Entrance Pavilion Cemetery Blankenberge by Hansteerds Architectuur

Through the windows, again the laths of the façade determine the view and deliver a nice play of sunlight and shadow on the walls and the floor.

Click above for larger image

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Architect: hansteerds architectuur, Amsterdam, (NL)
Project architect: Hans Teerds
Accompaniement: Johan Louagie, Bruges (B)
Client: City of Blankenberge, Blankenberge (B); Patrick De Clerck, Guy De Vos, Kurt Vanoosterhout, Kristof Jacobs, Sigrid Pinnoy
Contractor: Axis Bouw, Loppem (B)
Structural Engineer: Stedec, Roesselare (B)
Safety coordinator: Archiline, Bruge (B)
Building costs: € 188.433,-
Photographer: Philip Dujardin, Ghent (B)


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  • Kristen

    A cemetery is known as the place that gives you the creeps. But what I love about this pavilion is that it gives a warm feeling with all those materials.

  • edward

    Well done! . Interesting use of strand board.

  • alf

    I think project works really successfully, epseically with the wooden form being light and permeable in places but strong in creating the boundary to a quiet place beyond. I think the exterior works better than the interior, as in my opinion the OSB does not hav a lot of warmth.

  • felix

    does anyone know of projects where chipboard has been used like this in the past? I’m really interested in how it looks when it ages

  • http://lettuceoffice.com nico

    the project is nicely detailed but i always wonder how much maintenance goes into the upkeep of facades like these.

    osb typically has a really strong and unpleasant smell (formaldehyde). does anyone know what kind of treatment can be applied to it to get rid of the smell? i realize that by opting for a more sustainable material (ie. one that uses an adhesive without formaldehyde) the solution can be achieved but the cost is significantly different. any alternatives?