Ormond Esplanade by Judd
Lysenko Marshall Architects

| 9 comments

Round windows in black and red are plugged into the facade of this wood-clad house by Australian firm Judd Lysenko Marshall Architects that sits on the outskirts of Melbourne.

Ormond Esplanade by Judd Lysenko Marshall Architects

The three-storey residence, called Ormond Esplanade, is split across four levels with a half-level rise between the second and third floor.

Ormond Esplanade by Judd Lysenko Marshall Architects

The main stairwell has open risers and ascends through a void.

Ormond Esplanade by Judd Lysenko Marshall Architects

The timber-clad house sits on a sloping site with a low-level garden to the rear, which can be accessed via an external stair.

Ormond Esplanade by Judd Lysenko Marshall Architects

Here's some more from the architects


Ormond Esplanade

No, they (the client) said. Make it Saint Kilda.

Ormond Esplanade by Judd Lysenko Marshall Architects

And, make it light. Make it bright. Make it tight. Add all of the green stuff too, please. And, we want it beachy. Maybe like a boat? And it better be fun. Serious fun.

Ormond Esplanade by Judd Lysenko Marshall Architects

Hmn. How about spotted gum? Or even better, spotty gum.

Ormond Esplanade by Judd Lysenko Marshall Architects

Skin

A tight wrapped skin creates a shell for this vertical house. Like real skin, it’s blemished and rough. Something to protect the delicate inside, at once tough and resilient, but still stretchy, smooth, supple and tactile.

Ormond Esplanade by Judd Lysenko Marshall Architects

Baroque

Though seemingly abstract, this house is multilayered, replete with veiled secrets, like a dreaming or wandering left for the occupant to decode – a chain of intimate revelations.

Ormond Esplanade by Judd Lysenko Marshall Architects

Vertical Living

A tight block turns the circulation on its head. A three level stair rises behind the circular windows providing a connection between the four distinct zones.

Ormond Esplanade by Judd Lysenko Marshall Architects

The screen-printed hoop pine balustrade links the levels through a carefully constructed narrative of image and colour.

Ormond Esplanade by Judd Lysenko Marshall Architects

Zones for Living

A garden room lands the ground floor. A grand stair is mirrored inside and out and connects the lofty living to both the beach and the backyard.

Ormond Esplanade by Judd Lysenko Marshall Architects

The kid’s bedrooms are fun, exciting and colourful and the parent’s garret is necessarily moody, sexy and private.

Ormond Esplanade by Judd Lysenko Marshall Architects

Lean and Green

The void also provides passive stack ventilation, grounded in a masonry level and a permeable lid. Glazing is optimised and daylight carefully controlled.

Ormond Esplanade by Judd Lysenko Marshall Architects

A 2.0kw solar system provides energy. Rainwater flushes and washes while grey water keeps the grass green.

This is sensory architecture that cannot be engaged in a single eyeful.

Ormond Esplanade by Judd Lysenko Marshall Architects

Ormond Esplanade by Judd Lysenko Marshall Architects

A home of full of wonder and anticipation for a young family.

Ormond Esplanade by Judd Lysenko Marshall Architects


See also:

.

Smokey Town by Judd
Lysenko Marshall Architects
Mole
by Ninkipen!
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architecture stories
| 9 comments

Posted on Friday, October 1st, 2010 at 12:22 am by Joe Mills. See our copyright policy. Before commenting, please read our comments policy.

  • http://bit.ly/9ULZoY FUN

    Not so sure about the functionality, form or great taste…
    But frankly who cares?! This is pure architectural fun.
    And that's what matters at the end. 'Cause life must be fun.
    Let's have fun, architects. It is much more creative…

  • jupiter

    Great Work with the colors and GUNG-HO attitude to design..love it

  • samuel

    This is not "funny" at all. If an architecture do things by the fun side, he has a lot to learn. That's not fun, that's just ugly.

    • Felix

      boo miseryguts, what's not fun about it then? explain your points

      bright colours, irreverent details, informal proportions – all seems fun to me

  • SarahB

    Connect Four!

    I like it.

  • iursa

    Sou funny:))

  • ddarch

    I like it, who wants to see the same japanese white little houses again and again.

    (Let’s not even talk about the brick glad NEW structures of OLD britain…)

    • Liplin

      Yes Totally agree! Its very difficult to deal with colors and different materials and these guys have nailed it. I am too tired of seeing 100 permutations of the same white Japanese house. House are meant for living not just looking great in photoshoots.

  • R Reid

    " After 1980, you never heard reference to space again. Surface, the most convincing evidence of the descent into materialism, became the focus of design. Space disappeared. " Arthur Erickson.

    The use of space in design has returned to Ormond Esplanade.