House in Kohgo by Yutaka Yoshida
Architect & Associates

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House in Kohgo by Yutaka Yoshida Architect and Associates

Japanese studio Yutaka Yoshida Architect & Associates have completed this concrete family home in Hiroshima, Japan.

House in Kohgo by Yutaka Yoshida Architect and Associates

A concrete slab extends out of the side of the three-storey house at the rear, creating a narrow terrace.

House in Kohgo by Yutaka Yoshida Architect and Associates

A free-standing burgundy spiral staircase in the corner of the space connects all three floors and leads up to a landing with a floor made of wooden slats on the top level.

House in Kohgo by Yutaka Yoshida Architect and Associates

Exposed concrete features throughout the interior.

House in Kohgo by Yutaka Yoshida Architect and Associates

Large windows at the rear of the house bathe the interior with light.

House in Kohgo by Yutaka Yoshida Architect and Associates

Photographs are by Tomohiro Sakashita.

House in Kohgo by Yutaka Yoshida Architect and Associates

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House in Kohgo by Yutaka Yoshida Architect and Associates

The information below is from the architects:


This house is built in the residential area lined with the buildings which are a low-rise building to circumference adjacent to the park which is full of green.

House in Kohgo by Yutaka Yoshida Architect and Associates

2 stories did study, but chose 3 stories to own the garden in the south side among a rich connection of the outside space.

House in Kohgo by Yutaka Yoshida Architect and Associates

Mainly on the the second floor living that I joined together in direct stairs becoming two levels of colonnades from the entrance, a spiral staircase goes through a top and bottom floor.

House in Kohgo by Yutaka Yoshida Architect and Associates

The terrace which I pushed out and a screen by the aluminium sash wrap a place in the courtyard space of the form that is new in the vacant land that it was possible for on the site full the site that spread so that inside space protrudes.

House in Kohgo by Yutaka Yoshida Architect and Associates

I regard it as the wooden housing which hung the third floor floor with a steel frame to reduce building weight for 3 stories on the soft ground along the river.

House in Kohgo by Yutaka Yoshida Architect and Associates

The wooden floor inserted in a skeleton of the concrete of two levels of colonnades just shows the common joint which is constitution materials as makeup and forms a corridor in the shape of a drainboard.

House in Kohgo by Yutaka Yoshida Architect and Associates

Architect: YUTAKA YOSHIDA ARCHITECT & ASSOCIATES

House in Kohgo by Yutaka Yoshida Architect and Associates

Location: Hiroshima, Hiroshima, Japan

House in Kohgo by Yutaka Yoshida Architect and Associates

Project area: 119.73sqm

House in Kohgo by Yutaka Yoshida Architect and Associates

Project year: 2010

House in Kohgo by Yutaka Yoshida Architect and Associates


See also:

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Himeji Observatory House by KINO architects House with Big Spiral Staircase by Avehideshi Architects House in Koamicho by
Suppose Design Office
  • yuc

    Nice job. Especially the surface treatments relating to the tactile sensations are interresting.
    There is one thing that puzzles me. If the owners will not be wearing shoes in this house (as expected in Japan), the winters might be felt deeply through the flooring. Is that what is really aimed?

  • eilie

    interior is impressing i must admit.

    but japanese contemporary architecture starts to bore me- always the same: box-ish, intense use of concrete, lots of small windows, dark inside..
    so minimalistic in a brutal way..

    • Yrag

      Agreed.

  • ivan

    It's nice, just like most of those little Japanese houses. But I wonder when Japanese people will realize that there are more comfortable ways of building than concrete walls without insulation. Japanese winters are cold, too. Not to mention, that it's crazy in terms of energy-efficiency…

    • Dewayne

      I think its a matter of tradition. The more traditional will tend to lean towards the acceptance of nature within their homes. This was the standard for the japanese lifestyle. But then again I'm not Japanese so i can't really debate the topic.

  • Alex

    Not realy child friendly is it.

  • edward

    Great to see the Japanese keeping the flame for Corbu burning. This one is participially nice and recalled his work at Harvard. Some glass block would have been a nice touch.

  • Juliano

    LTH "Little Japanesse House". ____1. Minimalistic exterior shape__2. Intensive use of concrete and other cold materials__3 Abstract design of the facades (minimalistic windows)__5. No interests on energy saving (no "sustainability")__6. Not child friendly, no space for "disorder" ____

  • Jonathan

    Way too minimalist!. The cold concrete interior combined with the hard edges creates a suitable interior for a family of robots! People will look back years from now and see this build as another tombstone marking an era where architecture had no soul.

  • Marco

    I didn't click this one for a while, for it seemed like yet another minimalist japanese house, Which are great, but I'm rather saturated with them. Glad I did click in the end: the woord work is magnifiscent.

  • http://www.facebook.com/masahirokito Masahiro Kito

    An open yard with a solid modern design and architecture. This approach is rare in Japan, I think. But it might be most needed right now.

  • Gabi

    At first sight it looks like "another japanese concrete box". But a closer look at the plans tells that the organisation of the rooms, communal and private spaces is practical, easy to use and to move inside. The proportions are also fine, and details are carefully designed. I think it is a very nice piece in the row of "japanese concrete boxes" and in the row of houses anywhere in the world too.

  • http://www.facebook.com/lucas.defreitas Lucas Ramos de Freitas

    i just love the japanese minimalism!!!!

  • jess

    someone could fall through the opening under the closets. hope the owners are not always drunk from drinking sake.
    but I do love these cement boxes.