Chapel by Breathnach Donnellan O'Brien
and MEDS students

| 6 comments

Chapel by Breathnach Donnellan O'Brien and MEDS students

The students and tutors of a design and build workshop in Istanbul have constructed a seaside temple from oriented strand board.

Chapel by Breathnach Donnellan O'Brien and MEDS students

Irish architecture graduates Kieran Donnellan, Darragh Breathnach and Paul O Brien led the Chapel project as part of MEDS 2011, an annual event where European students collaborate on the design and fabrication of pavilions.

Chapel by Breathnach Donnellan O'Brien and MEDS students

The timber temple was designed around the theme Bridging Cultures and can be used by visitors of any religion as a space for repose.

Chapel by Breathnach Donnellan O'Brien and MEDS students

Located on a rock outcrop, the rectangular structure is raised above the ground on timber feet and features a portico entrance.

Chapel by Breathnach Donnellan O'Brien and MEDS students

Wooden planks create screens around the base of the walls and across the ceiling, allowing stripes of sunlight to permeate an interior that faces the ocean.

Chapel by Breathnach Donnellan O'Brien and MEDS students

A recess in the floor provides a place to sit.

Chapel by Breathnach Donnellan O'Brien and MEDS students

Graduate Darragh Breathnach is also a member of VAV Architects, who recently created a concealed passageway behind a secret mirror - see our earlier story here.

Chapel by Breathnach Donnellan O'Brien and MEDS students

See also: more stories about projects constructed from oriented strand boards here.

Chapel by Breathnach Donnellan O'Brien and MEDS students

Photography is by Kieran Donnellan.

Here are some more details from Donnellan:


Chapel

The name of the Chapel project is inspired by its origins in religious typologies, but the intention was simply to create a space that offers repose. The concept for the pavilion involved the exploration of spatial concepts relating to religious typologies from the Western and Eastern cultures that have shaped Istanbul. This was in response to the event theme of 'Bridging Cultures'.

Chapel by Breathnach Donnellan O'Brien and MEDS students

The pavilion occupies its site like a Greek temple, boldly situated on a prominent rock outcrop that allows it to be seen for miles along the local shoreline. Particular natural characteristics of the site, such as small cliffs and areas of thick wild grass, are used to best advantage in leading visitors on a journey around the pavilion, before gaining access.

Chapel by Breathnach Donnellan O'Brien and MEDS students

Upon reaching the entrance, the chapels' rectangular form ceases to be the regular datum highlighting the irregularity of the surrounding landscape, and instead folds in upon itself to create an inviting portico.

Chapel by Breathnach Donnellan O'Brien and MEDS students

The interior leaves Greek Classicism behind in favor of the intimacy of the Turkish Mosque typology. Just like the low horizontal datum, and soft ornate praying carpets of the Blue Mosque, the lower realm of the Chapel invites visitors to sit and relax, rewarding them with a stunning sea-view.

Chapel by Breathnach Donnellan O'Brien and MEDS students

Beams of sunlight from a roof light bathe the visitor as they move to take their seat. At this point one becomes aware of the meaning of the ring of baffles, as the slight views through them mimic that of looking through the wild grass beyond.

  • kms

    The way the OSB works with the color pallette of the site is really great here (though I hope its a temporary pavilion…). The absolute simplicity of the design and construction is powerful. The only thing that is that the pictures make it seem a lot bigger than the drawings show it as though, not sure about how it would feel to be standing in there.

    • Pumpnethyl

      It is beautiful. I never considered OSB as attractive, but it works well, especially in this location. I wonder if there is a moisture resistant version?

  • yeahno

    My only real question here is what makes it a chapel besides calling it a chapel?

    • http://paulobrienarchitects.tumblr.com/ Paul O' Brien

      This is an excerpt from the above article:

      'The name of the Chapel project is inspired by its origins in religious typologies, but the intention was simply to create a space that offers repose. The concept for the pavilion involved the exploration of spatial concepts relating to religious typologies from the Western and Eastern cultures that have shaped Istanbul. This was in response to the event theme of ‘Bridging Cultures’.'

      The initial design for the MEDS workshop was of a Chapel that was situated in Istanbul itself. Upon arrival to Istanbul arrangements changed, as they do, and we had to choose the final coastal location. Whlst we experienced Istanbul, including visits to the Haggia Sophia + Blue Mosque, the project direction was altered to a non-denominational stance. The final 'Chapel' is simply a place for a person to sit, relax and reflect in a pleasant space overlooking the ocean.

      Regards,
      Paul

      • Marcus

        Non-denominational stance? Make that non-religious stance.

        “The final ‘Chapel’ is simply a place for a person to sit, relax and reflect in a pleasant space overlooking the ocean.”

        As does a pavillion, gazebo or bench.

        In the end, yeahno is right. What makes it a “chapel” besides calling it so?

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100001404031982 Daniel Mikolajcak

    very nice project, being in the "chapel" is really great experience