Cantina de Comida Mexicana
by Taller Tiliche

| 8 comments

Cantina de Comida Mexicana by Taller Tiliche

Following our recent feature about projects that intentionally look as though the builders haven’t left yet, here’s a restaurant in Mexico City with lumps of plaster and holes on its ceiling.

Cantina de Comida Mexicana by Taller Tiliche

The Mexican food canteen was designed by architects Taller Tiliche, who laid a polished concrete floor but purposefully left the ceiling unfinished.

Cantina de Comida Mexicana by Taller Tiliche

Sanded wooden tables and stools furnish the restaurant and slatted panels screen the doors and windows.

Cantina de Comida Mexicana by Taller Tiliche

Bottle-filled shelves stretch between the walls of a bar at the back of the dining room, while a kitchen is located in a room next door.

Cantina de Comida Mexicana by Taller Tiliche

Other unfinished-looking projects we've featured include an apartment with cement smeared over its concrete walls and a cafe lined with timber offcuts.

Cantina de Comida Mexicana by Taller Tiliche

Photography is by Luis Gallardo.

Cantina de Comida Mexicana by Taller Tiliche

Here's some more text from Taller Tiliche:


Surtidora Abarrotera Mercantil Julio Gabriel Verne de Polanco, S.A. de C.V.

The project combines the retail space with space to eat, generating a combination between the displays, production areas, and consumption, also the bars of attention and shelves create enclosed spaces, organize the flows and create different environments for customers.

Cantina de Comida Mexicana by Taller Tiliche

The result is such a shop, what you see is what you get, and you can buy to take away or eat there.

Cantina de Comida Mexicana by Taller Tiliche

The space was designed with very basic materials.

Cantina de Comida Mexicana by Taller Tiliche

The floor was made of polished concrete and it has a direct relationship with the outside, getting pedestrians invited to the site, there are no divisions between public-private conditions of space.

Cantina de Comida Mexicana by Taller Tiliche

All existing walls were made with a first basement made ​​of concrete tiles from 0.0 to 1.2 meter, then was generated a second basement of white walls, ending with the existing roof as enclosure.

Cantina de Comida Mexicana by Taller Tiliche

It was important to use materials in their natural conditions (concrete, wood, galvanized sheet, etc..), in order to get low-cost, low maintenance and to show their construction process.

Cantina de Comida Mexicana by Taller Tiliche

For doors and windows designed a system of fixed and folding shutters of wood that can interact with the outside weather conditions and to adapt the space.

Cantina de Comida Mexicana by Taller Tiliche

This same solution was replicated at all doors and windows to filter light inside the room.

Cantina de Comida Mexicana by Taller Tiliche

  • greg

    Love: the bare space, natural light, contrast of meticulously placed design with unfinished construction.

    Hate: the foldable chairs!

    • hugo

      that particular model of foldable chair is a staple of mexican restaurants. you'll find them in the nastiest cantinas or in respectable family restaurants. usually they are part of a set which includes a table that has a checkerboard print that you can use to play checkers with discarded bottle caps.

  • Karen

    I wouldn't mind the ceiling, and a rough, unfinished look, but this space design smacks of a paint-your-own pottery establishment. No thanks. Not inviting for food and drinks.

  • alex

    I consider this to be one step too far… Shabby-chic and unfinished buildings are very different things – we don't want contractors thinking this is an acceptable finish . Or maybe I'm out of touch.

  • Shmuck

    i don't think it says to contractors poor finishes is an acceptable standard. What the designer has done is identify areas of clean tidy finishes and they have been applied, leaving in great contrast areas that are left "shabby chique" contracting a rather warm, relaed, and potentially enjoyable space. Lovely.

    • http://www.drodrigodasilva.com Rodrigo

      yes, and besides, I can proudly say it a well done aesthetic abstraction of the every-day-ordinary landscape in DF
      good job + the food is great

  • japr

    finally some hair and some dust after decades of spaces which are hard to distinguish from a rendering! viva la reality!

  • io.caprone

    As of 19 July 2012 there have been significant changes: the ceiling is “finished,” lots more color, the doors are solid not slatted. Oh well. Food and service are terrific. Worth the trip?