Inca Public Market by Charmaine Lay
and Carles Muro

| 20 comments

Inca Public Market by Charmaine Lay and Carles Muro

The zigzagging wooden roof of this market hall in Mallorca snakes around a plaza and over a car park entrance before sloping down to meet the ground.

Inca Public Market by Charmaine Lay and Carles Muro

Completed by architects Charmaine Lay and Carles Muro, the Inca Public Market and new plaza replace an older market hall that formerly occupied the site.

Inca Public Market by Charmaine Lay and Carles Muro

The building also accommodates small shops and council offices plus an underground supermarket and car park that are located beneath the public square.

Inca Public Market by Charmaine Lay and Carles Muro

Louvered windows diffuse daylight into the timber-framed hall, while wooden panels clad the base of the building’s exterior.

Inca Public Market by Charmaine Lay and Carles Muro

You can see more stories about markets here, including a concrete fish market in Istanbul.

Inca Public Market by Charmaine Lay and Carles Muro

Photography is by Jose Hevia, apart from where otherwise stated.

Inca Public Market by Charmaine Lay and Carles Muro

Above: photograph by Jaime Sicilia

Here's some more information from Charmaine Lay:


Inca Public Market
Charmaine Lay / Carles Muro

The demolition of the old market building has offered the opportunity to rediscover a new public space in the heart of the city of Inca, just a few metres away from the Main Street and the Town Hall.

Inca Public Market by Charmaine Lay and Carles Muro

The proposal tries to obtain the maximum possible amount of public space while accommodating the different requirements of a varied programme: car park, supermarket, retail shops, council offices and public market.

A public space that aims at supporting the present and future activities of this place.

Inca Public Market by Charmaine Lay and Carles Muro

The car park and the supermarket are located underground, while the rest of the required programme rises from the ground reaching its maximum height with the council offices.

Inca Public Market by Charmaine Lay and Carles Muro

Beginning at one end of the site, the wooden paving detaches itself from the ground in order to cover the entrance to the car park.

Inca Public Market by Charmaine Lay and Carles Muro

This wooden strip continues as a kind of pergola that runs parallel to the street, wrapping the main public space of the square, before transforming itself once again –unfolding into three sloped planes– to become the roof of the market.

Inca Public Market by Charmaine Lay and Carles Muro

A final horizontal stretch covers the building containing the retail spaces and the council offices.

Inca Public Market by Charmaine Lay and Carles Muro

This strip will become the main element of continuity throughout the project and reflects upon the surface the hidden structural bays of the car park beneath.

Inca Public Market by Charmaine Lay and Carles Muro

The market is understood as a covered plaza that is continuous with the public space surrounding it. The folds of the market roof allow for the natural light and ventilation desired.

Inca Public Market by Charmaine Lay and Carles Muro

Location: Inca (Majorca)
Client: Ajuntament d’Inca (Inca City Council)
Contractor: Dragados [first phase] / Melchor Mascaró [second phase]

Inca Public Market by Charmaine Lay and Carles Muro

Architects: Charmaine Lay, Carles Muro
Collaborators: Miquel Mariné (Project Architect)
Susana Aristoy, Juan Carlos Castro, David Domínguez, Raphaël de Montard, Alfredo Peñafiel, Gisela Planas, Anna Tantull, Ferran Vizoso
Structural engineers: GMK Associats [design stage] / BOMA (Lluís Moya, Xavier Aguiló) [site]
Services engineers: Instal·lacions Arquitectòniques (Albert Salazar, Cristian González)
Quantity surveyors: Forteza Carbonell Associats (Jordi Carbonell, Xavier Arumí)
Site surveyor: Héctor Fernández

  • edward

    Graphics on the ceiling in the car park?!! Dunno about that. And a wooden roof structure seems out of place here. Also the lack of focus as to a grand entry is puzzling.

  • Maurice

    which did project do first? http://el-muro.org/A/09/08_PDLV/FM/FM_MV.html
    casuality?

  • http://twitter.com/AndrewFMK @AndrewFMK

    Like the positive/negative formal gestures. Shame you can't actually get on the roof…

  • http://dailygrail.com/ Red Pill Junkie

    No handrails?

    • johnny

      sad to say but that was the first thing i thought, surely not?!

  • julien

    During the competition there were no doubt renders of people walking up the roof of the building, taking a view out onto the square, people skating, running. Then the client said: we don't want any of that, or perhaps it was cheaper to do a light steel roof that wasn't designed to hold human weight. And the Architects said yes, ok. And then you have a building that is the remnants of an idea.

    • edward

      Then maybe they should have torn up the prelims and started over with a new conception.

  • amsam

    I'm with Andrew and RPJ, this looks great from the sky, but if the roof isn't open to the public the only really interesting gesture can only be appreciated on dezeen and google earth.

  • mmm
  • rock

    so many negative comments! great project, in all its simplicity + pragmatic solutions. no handrail… so stay back junkie; can't get on the roof… so what, if the roof comes down to the ground andrew. graphics on the ceiling – just think: it's another horizontal surface like the floor right? but it stays clean edward. + byw, it's not a cathedral; in a market the people sift in from all sides, cross it, go out onto the square / plaça / piazza. at least in europe, ed. maurice, i don't know but i'd say neither these guys nor el muro project cited by yourself above would be the first (+ original) building as a ramp, ramp as roof, type concept. koolhaus in seattle…. etc etc.
    felicitats als arquitectes, ben fet!
    oh, i have a criticism / question of dezeen here: you know where mallorca is?

    • http://twitter.com/Dezeen @Dezeen

      Yes we do, why do you ask?

    • edward

      Re ceiling graphics, obviously the idea was to eliminate those pesky signs sticking out everywhere, but a driver better be looking at the road chiefly. However given the very low ceilings in garages, it might work. If not…back to signs.

    • http://dailygrail.com/ Red Pill Junkie

      >"so many negative comments! great project, in all its simplicity + pragmatic solutions. no handrail… so stay back junkie"

      You don't have any children, have you? ;)

      It's ok, neither do I. But safety should never be overlooked. And safety issues is one of the first things in mind of construction regulators at the time of approving a project, specially if it's intended for public use. That's what inspired the question.

      If the ceiling really is not open for walking, then it's a shame because it really looked like a neat place to hang out.

      Saludos.

      • http://www.facebook.com/raz.keltch Raz Keltsh

        I for one think the roof should not be made for walking seeing as it would be pointless taking the retaivley boring sorrounding contexts (views), and the fact that there is nothing specifically interesting to do there. Furthermore, I do not see the need for a roof such as this in the first place, it works harmoniousley as an object with itself, but not with the entrances to the project nor does it seem to contribute greatley pragmatically to the market place inside. Yes this is a negative comment, but the project as far as the images provided, does not seem to be a good solution. Perhaps beeing there however is a different story.

  • Rafel

    rather awful the environment, maybe a smaller building would have been better? It all looks to dense with the neighboring buildings.

  • Paulo

    Roof comes down to the ground so people can access and no handrail. Even though it is intended that it isn't accessable to the public, when someone falls off the roof and breaks their neck, see how that holds up in court.

    Very nice project with exception of bizzare roof intention.

  • Mima

    Aren't you a funny lot… would you really all rather a flat roof.. ? I think it breaks up the volume nicely and creates a variety of spaces inside as well as exposing some interesting / fun structure.. the variety of levels also contributes to the facade. Has the sense of a slightly more organic / home-made steven holl to me..

    And also i envy these Mediterranean cultures putting time, energy and money into heart of town markets and WISH we could do more of that here in old blighty rather than tearing hearts out of market towns with yet more supermarkets (no names)

  • edorta

    Maybe the sloping roof fails in its intention of being an accessible one, but it certainly succeeds in its relation with the different scales of the surrounding buildings (did you notice the massive orange building?). More than a building, i think that the architect has created a "landscape" that gives some kind of sense to all those unconnected architectures. Look again at those beautiful photographs and you'll know what I mean.

  • PlanC

    That remark from Maurice…wich was first. Altough it was a competition and was first (?) of the known, the aproach and response of the problem is much better solved in the PlanB proposal for PLV…. But they are different problems, cities and programs.And one is still in the drawer, the other is there, build. That has a merit to, even without a handrail….(by the way, either for maintenance people?mmm the regulations…)