Reflections at Keppel Bay
by Daniel Libeskind

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Reflections at Keppel Bay by Daniel Libeskind

Architect Daniel Libeskind has completed a family of curved towers beside a bay in Singapore.

Reflections at Keppel Bay by Daniel Libeskind

Alternating between 24 and 41 storeys-high, the six glazed residential towers feature rooftop gardens and are connected to one another by elevated bridges.

Reflections at Keppel Bay by Daniel Libeskind

The Reflections at Keppel Bay development also includes a series of aluminium-clad apartment blocks that accompany the high-rise buildings to create over a thousand new residences in total.

Reflections at Keppel Bay by Daniel Libeskind

You can see more projects by Daniel Libeskind here, including a war museum that sparked a fiery debate amongst our readers.

Reflections at Keppel Bay by Daniel Libeskind

Photography is © Courtesy of Keppel Bay Pte Ltd - a Keppel Land Company.

Here's a longer description from Studio Daniel Libeskind:


Keppel Harbor, Reflections at Keppel Bay

Prominently situated at the entrance to Sin­gapore’s historic Keppel Harbor, Reflections at Keppel Bay is a two-million-square-foot residential development comprised of 6 high-rise towers ranging from 24 and 41 stories and 11 low-rise villa apart­ment blocks of 6–8 floors-- a total of 1,129 units.

Reflections at Keppel Bay by Daniel Libeskind

The series of high-rise undulating towers is the focal point of this project. These sleek curving forms of alternating heights create graceful openings and gaps between the structures allowing all to have commanding views of the waterfront, Sentosa, the golf course and Mount Faber.

Reflections at Keppel Bay by Daniel Libeskind

The Libeskind design for Reflections at Keppel Bay skillfully tackles the challenge faced by architects working in contexts such as Singapore: the high-density construction needed to recoup the exorbitant cost of real estate. To address this issue, rather than equally distributing the density across the site with similar building types, the design is composed of two distinct typologies of housing; the lower Villa blocks along the water front and the high-rise towers which over look them set just behind.

Reflections at Keppel Bay by Daniel Libeskind

The artful composition of ever shifting building orientations, along with the differing building typologies, creates an airy, light-filled grouping of short and tall structures. These ever shifting forms create an experience where each level feels unique as it is not in alignment with either the floor above or below.

Reflections at Keppel Bay by Daniel Libeskind

No two alike residences are experienced next to one another or seen from the same perspective; the result of this design is a fundamental shift in living in a high-rise where individuality and difference is not sacrificed.

Reflections at Keppel Bay by Daniel Libeskind

A recipient of the BCA Green Mark Gold Award  from Singapore’s building and construction authority, the form, construction and materials of the buildings are unprecedented for Singapore and particularly for a residential development.

Reflections at Keppel Bay by Daniel Libeskind

The double curvatures of the high-rise towers are unique in the world for structure and construction; they are clad with a fully unitized and insulated curtain wall which is among the first for residential developments in the region.

Reflections at Keppel Bay by Daniel Libeskind

The low-rise villas along the water front are clad in anodized aluminum that creates a luminous surface and provides additional insulation. The six towers are crowned with lush sky gardens on sloping rooflines and linked by sky bridges, providing pockets of open spaces and platforms and unobstructed 360-degree views, the kind of green, open space, rarely found in high-rise buildings.

Reflections at Keppel Bay by Daniel Libeskind

Daniel Libeskind’s first residential project in Asia, and his largest completed residential project to date, Reflections is a creative in­terplay of changing planes and reflections.  It defies the inherent nature of high-density residential developments with its innovative approach to design-- creating a new land mark for the greater Singapore.

  • Resta

    More floppy penises from Libeskind. Yawn ….

  • Dan

    I think that I only share my given name with Libeskind. The curves should have a purpose, a sense of flow and movement that are completely absent in this design. On the other hand the proportion and disposition of vertical elements create an obvious distortion that gives an unpleasant effect to the complex. Formalism keeps showing its darkest side in too many contemporary works.

  • jan

    If you’re drunk, they all look just right.

  • ding ks

    This is lalang (type of long grass) by the Bay. Respect the imagination.