Storage House by
Ryuji Fujimura Architects

| 21 comments
 

Slideshow: a wooden library climbs the walls of this four-storey house in Kanagawa, Japan.

Storage House by Ryuji Fujimura Architects

Starting in the basement, the first set of bookshelves are a storey high, while a second set begin on the first floor and rise up to reach the ceiling of the floor above.

Storage House by Ryuji Fujimura Architects

Tokyo studio Ryuji Fujimura Architects designed the residence, which is enclosed behind a grey powder-coated steel facade.

Storage House by Ryuji Fujimura Architects

A mixture of both concrete and steel staircases connect the levels inside the house, while ladders provide access to a second floor loft and to the highest bookshelves.

Storage House by Ryuji Fujimura Architects

Ladders are a common feature of many residences we feature from Japan. Ones worth a look include a house with climbing walls inside and another where rooms overlap one another.

Storage House by Ryuji Fujimura Architects

See also: a house completely lined with bookshelves in Osaka.

Storage House by Ryuji Fujimura Architects

Photography is by Takumi Ota.

Storage House by Ryuji Fujimura Architects

Here's some more information from Ryuji Fujimura Architects:


Storage House by Ryuji Fujimura Architects

The house like a storage located in a residential area on the suburbs of Tokyo.

Storage House by Ryuji Fujimura Architects

By providing the underground space, the volume of three floors encloses the space of two layers.

Storage House by Ryuji Fujimura Architects

The parking has a large canopy, such as loading dock.

Storage House by Ryuji Fujimura Architects

It can be used as a space people gather and is intended to successive to the streets.

Storage House by Ryuji Fujimura Architects

Location: Kanagawa, Japan
Type: private residence

Storage House by Ryuji Fujimura Architects

Architects: Ryuji Fujimura Architects
Structural engineer: Konishi Structural Engineers

Storage House by Ryuji Fujimura Architects

Site area: 57.82 m2
Building area: 31.69m2
Floor area total: 56.26m2
Floor area by floor: b1f: 30.31m2 / 1f: 30.31m2 / 2f: 33.00m2

Storage House by Ryuji Fujimura Architects

Design period: aug. 2009 - oct. 2010
Construction period: nov. 2010 - apr. 2011
Structure: steel, reinforced concrete

Storage House by Ryuji Fujimura Architects

  • morgs96

    Some of these spaces really look quite dangerous! Certainly it's not a place for small children or people under the influence of alcohol to live in. Which to me makes it deeply flawed. And what's so bad about the street that they couldn't have a window or two? On the plus side it really squeezes a lot into a very small footprint (you couldn't do stairs that steep in other jurisdictions). However, I'm just imagining holding books and climbing up that big ladder at the same time . . . scary!

  • Bhavnesh

    Stunning as ever in typical Japanese fashion.

    I do feel a little nervous due to the wooden library being located on the 'landing' of the stairs – more so the ladder! I can't imagine that'd pass building regulations in the UK, but we're pretty boring with that sort of stuff anyway.

    I love this, and I want it : )

  • Paola

    Stairs in front of stairs? I’d be really scared of falling.

  • mik

    I love this houses. But somehow they only exist in japan.
    I wish we were allowed to do all those stairs and thin walls.
    what is this fetish on gigantic book shelfs?
    I've seen many houses with this book shelf but with 6 books.
    And one comment to the plans. mezzanines are not lofts and loft means converting something industrial or whatever into something more domestic like housing.
    and the lower window in the dinning room is just silly.
    does this really exist or it's just a render from a student?
    what a silly house

    • mksh

      "A loft is an upper storey or attic in a building, directly under the roof. Alternatively, a loft apartment refers to large adaptable open space, often converted for residential use (a converted loft) from some other use, often light industrial."

  • http://twitter.com/WalnutGrey @WalnutGrey

    Reading the above comments, some people worry too much. UK planning regulations are a right pain!

    I love this house. It is stunning in its design, clarity and simplicity. Yet another example of amazing Japanese architecture.

  • DK405

    We are still having massive earthquakes on a regular basis in Kanto….. I wouldn't want to be on that landing with a 4+ hits and all the books come crashing down. Seriously dangerous.

  • Andee

    Putting back the books on the shelves after the earth shook is tedious. And that hardbound falling on somebody's head while eating sushi downstairs is not a joke. Earthquake is a Japanese reality.

  • DK405

    @mik-
    The lower window in the dinning room is an adaptation of the traditional yukimishouji (snow viewing window.) They are using it to allow light in while restricting the view. If you look in the photos there is a nice view for about a meter, then a bicycle parking structure on the next plot.

  • okpala

    luvin' this sexy tiny living box!

    when furnished with all the colourful Japanese paperbacks and manga curiosa, the library will be a thriving hearth that commends the other spaces. what seems totally austere and introverted from the outside, is a sheer delight and joyful on the inside.

  • Ogier de Beauseant

    Inscrutable. Only an Oriental can see the logic here of this house. But if the client's are satisfied, then all's well.

  • http://dailygrail.com/ Red Pill Junkie

    Visually stunning but a really poor solution in the end.

    The picture taken from above shows you the space left between the library ladder and the top of the 1st staircase is little over 40 cm (approx). Very inadequate.

    Good luck trying to take something bigger than a suitcase to the upper floors.

  • Sensible

    C'mon, is that really a house, or is it just a piece of origami?

    If it's are real house, several things are apparent:

    1. If there are safety codes, they are wholly ignored.
    2. If there are building inspections, they are jokes.
    3. If there are no codes and no inspections, then the Japanese have a truly barbaric society.

  • JuiceMajor

    Gotto love Japanese house design. They can do so much with so little.

  • dezy

    look at second photo… this is like in a white nightmare… or vertigo by hitchcock

  • e1027

    Yes building regs are different in Japan – and it does seem they're a bit slack(!) in some respects compared to other regions, but this allows for some truely joyous domestic design that we just couldn't do in the west. ENJOY! This very modest project really needs the 4 sections to describe it, which is always a good sign. The thesis of this is surely concerned with providing spatially complex and naturally (indirectly) lit spaces, dispite the tiny proportions, and without just using big windows. All that 'ladder is so scarey' business is totally beside the point!!

  • rock

    so many anal comments! the house is beautiful, well designed.
    earthquakes, suitcases, alcohol, not to mention burglaries, fires, broken legs, blindness, etc. etc. are all daily realities that affect our perception of bookshelves, stairs + other elements of space… so let the owner decide, it's their house right!!!

  • Emma Tameside

    Wouldn’t like to wander around that house after having one too many glasses of wine! It looks light a right death-trap! A stylish one perhaps, but still a death-trap :)

    Apart from the bookcase, where would the occupants store their stuff? We stayed in a very minimalist apartment in 2009 in the centre of the city and it was so small, bare and spartan that we had no choice but to look for storage Aylesford units for half our clothes, most of our books, and our bikes.

    We stuck it out for about a year and then decided it wasn’t worth looking cool for the sake of style. Besides, nothing beats the feeling of plush carpet between your toes on a cold, winter’s evening.

  • Y.Kurosawa

    It's not a place to live. Dead.

  • JamesBennett

    I love the concept of this house! Even though each level seems squeezy and there is a space constraint, the overall layout still works out well as there is sufficient room for people to walk around and go up the stairs to reach the other levels.

  • http://twitter.com/DeanAshby2 @DeanAshby2

    I love the concept of this house! Even though each level seems squeezy and there are space constraints, the overall layout still works out well as there is sufficient room for people to walk around and go up the stairs to reach the other levels.