Daeyang Gallery and House
by Steven Holl Architects

| 6 comments
 

Slideshow: New York architect Steven Holl has concealed a underground gallery beneath a pool of water in Seoul, the city in South Korea that we've been focusing on following a string of proposals for skyscrapers.

Daeyang Gallery and House by Steven Holl Architects

Named Daeyang Gallery and House, the copper-clad building has two pavilions that rise up above the water to provide an entrance and an event space for the private gallery, while a third is the home of the owner.

Daeyang Gallery and House by Steven Holl Architects

The architects claim that the building's proportions follow the patterns of a musical score by Hungarian-Canadian composer Istvan Anhalt, which they say can be best observed in the arrangement of 55 skylights on the roofs of the three blocks.

Daeyang Gallery and House by Steven Holl Architects

More skylights are scattered across the base of the pool, so daylight must pass through the water before entering the gallery.

Daeyang Gallery and House by Steven Holl Architects

Above: photograph is by Inho Lee

See all our recent stories about projects in South Korea here and see more architecture by Steven Holl here.

Daeyang Gallery and House by Steven Holl Architects

Above: photograph is by Inho Lee

Photography is by Iwan Baan, apart from where otherwise stated.

Daeyang Gallery and House by Steven Holl Architects

Here's some more information from Steven Holl Architects:


Daeyang Gallery and House Seoul, Korea
2008 - 2012

The private gallery and house is sited in the hills of the Kangbuk section of Seoul, Korea.

Daeyang Gallery and House by Steven Holl Architects

The project was designed as an experiment parallel to a research studio on “the architectonics of music.”

Daeyang Gallery and House by Steven Holl Architects

The basic geometry of the building is inspired by a 1967 sketch for a music score by the composer Istvan Anhalt, “Symphony of Modules,” which was discovered in a book by John Cage titled “Notations.”

Daeyang Gallery and House by Steven Holl Architects

Above: photograph is by Inho Lee

Three pavilions; one for entry, one residence, and one event space, appear to push upward from a continuous gallery level below. A sheet of water establishes the plane of reference from above and below.

Daeyang Gallery and House by Steven Holl Architects

Above: photograph is by Inho Lee

The idea of space as silent until activated by light is realized in the cutting of 55 skylight strips in the roofs of the three pavilions.

Daeyang Gallery and House by Steven Holl Architects

Above: photograph is by Inho Lee

In each of the pavilions, 5 strips of clear glass allow the sunlight to turn and bend around the inner spaces, animating them according to the time of day and season. Proportions are organized around the series 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55.

Daeyang Gallery and House by Steven Holl Architects

Views from within the pavilions are framed by the reflecting pool, which is bracketed by gardens that run perpendicular to the skylight strips.

Daeyang Gallery and House by Steven Holl Architects

In the base of the reflecting pool, strips of glass lenses bring dappled light to the white plaster walls and white granite floor of the gallery below.

Daeyang Gallery and House by Steven Holl Architects

A visitor arrives through a bamboo formed garden wall at the entry court, after opening the front door and ascending a low stair.

Daeyang Gallery and House by Steven Holl Architects

He or she can turn to see the central pond at eye level and take in the whole of the three pavilions, floating on their own reflections.

Daeyang Gallery and House by Steven Holl Architects

The interiors of the pavilions are red and charcoal stained wood with the skylights cutting through the wood ceiling. Exteriors are a rain screen of custom patinated copper which ages naturally within the landscape.

  • honey

    I'm curious to see the details between the wet and dry areas.very well constructed.

  • Lizi

    Would be good to see the original musical score sketch

  • Patricia Jessee

    As an artist who loves to paint improvisationally to live music- the thought of actually breaking down a Cage piece into a representaion of livable, architecture fills me like a tsunami…. Mathmatics would be every childs choice if they could see it on these different levels. But what is really mind blowing that it was thought of , had trust from people, and was actually completed and now will live a piece of the music every moment of its ageing thru time- greeting rain, and wind with a score to join in. bravo

  • Colonel Pancake

    I think it's cluttered and a little brash. Too many surface types.Too many geometric schemes. Too many irregularities.

  • Ahmed

    It would be nice if you could provide more details such as the characteristics of the buildings including external and internal features.