House in Rokko by
Tato Architects

| 11 comments
 

This hillside house by Japanese studio Tato Architects comprises a metal barn on top of a glass box (+ slideshow).

House in Rokko by Tato Architects

Located between a mountainous district and the harbour-side town of Kobe in southern Japan, the two-storey House in Rokko contains a kitchen and dining room inside its transparent ground-level storey.

House in Rokko by Tato Architects

A balcony surrounds the gabled first floor, creating an overhang that shades the glazed facade below.

House in Rokko by Tato Architects

Upstairs, the bathroom is separated by a transparent glass partition.

House in Rokko by Tato Architects

During construction, the foundations had to be dug by hand as no machines were able to climb the steep terrain to reach the site, while the streel structure had to be pieced together from sections small enough to be carried up one by one.

House in Rokko by Tato Architects

We've featured a few houses in Japan with glazed bathrooms, including one with a garden behind its walls and one with a whole room dedicated to plants.

House in Rokko by Tato Architects

See more Japanese houses on Dezeen »

House in Rokko by Tato Architects

Photography is by Ken'ichi Suzuki.

Here's a project description from Tato Architects:


House in Rokko

Looking for the way an architecture does not fix the affect to the environment too much I have been somewhat anxious about what an architecture in a place commanding a fine view should be. It is the state of affairs freezing affect towards the environment. What is the way, while enjoying the view, not to be dominant to the environment?

House in Rokko by Tato Architects

At an end of the residential area developed in the past halfway up Mt. Rokko the site was broad but too steep to bring in heavy machines for driving piles. A plane of 3.5 m by 13.5 m was left when a sufficient distance was secured, for manual digging for foundation, from the old breast wall and heaped soil.

House in Rokko by Tato Architects

The site was not necessitating much anxiety about people’s eyes. As people’s eyes from below would not reach the first floor, the first floor was walled with glass all around so that the fine view could be commanded to full extent, which was equipped with kitchen and visitor’s toilet.

House in Rokko by Tato Architects

The first floor, while functioning as what is called LDK, was assumed to be used for such varieties of activities out of daily life as treating guests, creating music with friends, or taking care of his bicycles.

House in Rokko by Tato Architects

A bedroom, storing facilities, facilities using water were arranged on the second floor, which was leveled high with a roof of conventional appearance to join in the existing rows of old houses. The high- leveled second floor was walled around with wide openings distributed equally for the ease of natural ventilation.

House in Rokko by Tato Architects

Thermal storage system using midnight electricity was laid into slab concrete and on the second floor far-infrared radiation film floor heating system was supplemented. And in summer it is expected that balcony and eaves will block the sunlight and breeze from Mt. Rokko will carry indoor heat through.

House in Rokko by Tato Architects

Steel-frame construction was adopted complying with the client’s wishes. As physical labor was obliged, small 100 mm by 100 mm H-section steel was selected and each construction material was limited to weigh about 100 kg for carrying up to the site.

House in Rokko by Tato Architects

Steel plate of 4.5 mm thick was laid for the cantilever balcony all around to make up for the loss of level structural plane caused by a large cutout of the second floor for stairway.

House in Rokko by Tato Architects

Observing the environment carefully without responding downright resulted in this house of hollow bare mortar floor ceilinged high and walled around with glass.

House in Rokko by Tato Architects

I feel I have found a way to cope, on an equal footing, with the environment peculiar to this scenic site where the environment, the architecture and the resident’s various things of various styles and ages are mingling with each other.

House in Rokko by Tato Architects

Project name: House in Rokko
Location of site: Kobe Japan

House in Rokko by Tato Architects

Site area: 295.31m2
Building area: 56.00m2

House in Rokko by Tato Architects

Total floor area: 94.50m2
Type of Construction: Steel
Program: house & atelier

House in Rokko by Tato Architects

Project by: Tato architects
Principal designer: Yo shimada

Design period: Jan. 2010 - Mar. 2011
Construction period: Aug. 2011 - Nov. 2011

  • Don

    I couldn't live in it, but it;s also so simple and beautiful that I just love it.

  • http://www.walnutgreydesign.com/ Mr Walnut Grey

    It is perhaps a cliché to say this house has a wow factor, but it truly does. Inspired, aesthetic and with a wonderfully individual character.

  • Shelle

    I love it. What is that film on the glass to the bathroom? So pretty…
    Didn’t see the bedroom though

  • http://www.lightfield.us Alexander

    Alexander

    This building is a piece of art as much as a piece of architecture.
    I just wish the project description would provide some info on these glass partitions of the second floor.

  • Alex

    I like! Refreshingly authentic and straightforward in its execution and concept. The colorful glass partition reminds me of olafur eliasson. Very Reduced Architecture that flows into the realm of Space as Art.

  • http://dailygrail.com/ Red Pill Junkie

    I wished there was more integration between the lower and the higher parts of this project. But I can't deny it's a cool house.

    • Don

      Isn’t that (a loss of integration) a basic idea of the building?

  • Bro

    Seems like a great party venue at night…

  • Joana

    Hi! Does anyone know what material was used to make the colour effect on the windows of the second floor? A filter? Film? Thanks!

    • http://www.dezeen.com Dezeen

      Hi Joana, the architects have informed us that they stuck "optical film" over the glass. Amy/Dezeen

  • Joana

    Thank you Amy! It creates a great effect and really modifies the space! It’s a kind of “magic”. =)