Underground Supporter
posters by Rizon

| 6 comments

Underground Supporter posters by Rizon

London designers Rizon have created a series of unofficial posters for businesses to sidestep strict marketing rules that prevent them publicising their involvement in the London 2012 Olympics.

Underground Supporter posters by Rizon

Their Underground Supporter posters can be downloaded here and are designed to avoid infringing the guidelines published by Olympic organisers LOCOG.

Underground Supporter posters by Rizon

"Working in the field of licensing and merchandising, the draconian way LOCOG has enforced the brand rules around small and medium enterprises wanting to show their support of the games has incensed us," says Rizon's managing director Dave Collins. "Total control for sponsors is not the Olympic spirit and certainly not in the spirit of British fair play."

He thinks LOCOG cold have generated revenue by creating a discrete official program called the 'official supporters program'. For a small fee businesses would be able to download a pack of approved marketing materials allowing them to demonstrate their support for the games.

Underground Supporter posters by Rizon

New London Architecture chair Peter Murray wore a T-shirt listing all the architects and engineers involved in London 2012 but unable to promote their contribution at yesterday's Creative Industries Summit and made the design available to download via Dezeen Wire.

See all our stories about London 2012 »

  • http://twitter.com/matthewnotmatt @matthewnotmatt

    "posters … are designed to avoid infringing the guidelines published by Olympic organisers LOCOG"

    They've been designed to avoid infringing the Olympic guidelines by infringing the London Underground guidelines, eh?

    On the Roundel design TFL says: "Strict rules exist about how the roundel can be implemented, and copyright exists on its reproduction. Anyone wishing to use any of TfL’s modal roundels or other corporate logos will need to apply for permission."

    So was there permission to use it?

  • Rob

    Easy @matthernotmatt, hope you didn’t type that using Johnson font!

  • Rob Ray

    The roundel first appeared in 1908 and the modern version in 1917, going public in 1918. That should mean it lost copyright on the circle and bar in 1988 (70 years since it was first made public)?

    • TVDW

      By your logic some of the world's most recognisable logos would be available for anyone to use! The issue with the roundel is one of 'intellectual property'; it's TfL's IP and it can't be used legitimately without permission. Regardless, it's just lazy design by Rizon.

  • mark

    “He thinks LOCOG cold have generated revenue” – is this an intended reference to UK weather or a typo?

  • petevincent

    So not so much a criticism of the commercialisation of the games and the illiberal laws brought in to enforce this, more of a mild whinge that some businesses couldn't afford to join in?