Villa Nieuw Oosteinde
by Engelarchitecten

| 4 comments
 

A prefabricated concrete cube appears to hover above the wooden base of this house near Amsterdam by Dutch practice Engelarchitecten (+ slideshow).

Villa Nieuw Oosteinde by Engelarchitecten

Located in the town of Aalsmeer, the villa was built on a lot that had very specific development requirements set out by the local government – the building had to be a small tower, like a gatekeeper's house.

Villa Nieuw Oosteinde by Engelarchitecten

"It had to be out of the ordinary and not the same as other traditional houses in the vicinity," architect Maarten Engel told Dezeen. Fortunately, "this very much appealed to the clients, so they purchased the lot."

Villa Nieuw Oosteinde by Engelarchitecten

The architects came up with a cost-efficient cube of prefabricated concrete measuring just nine metres on each side, which sits atop a horizontally clad hardwood base.

Villa Nieuw Oosteinde by Engelarchitecten

Above the wooden base is a narrow strip of glazing to give the impression that the concrete cube is hovering slightly above it.

Villa Nieuw Oosteinde by Engelarchitecten

On the ground floor, a glass corridor connects the kitchen and living areas to a separate workspace used by one of the residents, who is a florist.

Villa Nieuw Oosteinde by Engelarchitecten

A walled roof terrace is embedded in the top of the cube and also equipped with a kitchen.

Villa Nieuw Oosteinde by Engelarchitecten

Other Dutch houses we've featured recently on Dezeen include a houseboat with geometric patterns on its facade and a pair of houses disguised as one.

See all our stories about Dutch houses »
See all stories about concrete »

Villa Nieuw Oosteinde by Engelarchitecten

Photography is by Marcel van der Burg.

Here's some more text from the architects:


Engel Architecten has realised a villa with a building system that has its roots in industrial and commercial buildings.

The villa is made from prefabricated concrete element. This system is widely used for industrial and commercial buildings, but this is one of the first times it has been used for a villa. One of the big advantages is the cost and the building speed, without having to make concession in build quality and spatial experience.

Villa Nieuw Oosteinde by Engelarchitecten

Ground floor plan

It consists of a perfect cube placed in the axis of a green strip in a newly formed neighborhood in Aalsmeer, a medium-sized town close to Amsterdam. Next to the cube a small workspace is placed. The workspace is connected to the main volume by a glass corridor. On top of the house there is a roof terrace with a built-in kitchen.

Villa Nieuw Oosteinde by Engelarchitecten

First floor elevation

The materials used are both natural and industrial: precast smooth concrete and wooden sidings made from padouk, an African FSC hardwood type. The concrete and wood are separated by glass windows. This disconnects the concrete from the wood so that the concrete block seems to hover above the wooden plinth.

Villa Nieuw Oosteinde by Engelarchitecten

Roof terrace plan

  • Paul

    I like the exterior design, but the living space looks boring, cold from the inside. By the way: If there is a table in the kitchen area, what purpose does the dining area serve then?

    • Juan Galicia

      Oh finally! You see where I come from no one can conceive a house without an “ante-comedor”, which is basically a small dining room within the kitchen, which is used by the family. Then there’s the dining room, which will be used for special occasions. I just never got it, I would just rather have the one dining room but that’s how it is in some parts :P

      • http://dailygrail.com/ Red Pill Junkie

        It doesn't make sense, and yet the real estate market still demands such conventionalities.

  • Nicolas

    Is it possible to find paint of a different color than white for the inside of a Dutch house? ;-)