Villa 921 by
Harunatsu-Archi

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This concrete bungalow on a remote Japanese island is built to protect its occupants from both extremely bright sunshine and destructive typhoons (+ slideshow).

Villa 921 by Harunatsu-Archi

Designed by architects Harunatsu-Archi, the single-storey Villa 921 is located in Iriomote, an island that can only be accessed by boat and is mostly covered by rainforests and swamps.

Villa 921 by Harunatsu-Archi

The wood and glass walls slide open across the front and rear of the building, allowing the wind to move through the rooms.

Villa 921 by Harunatsu-Archi

Projecting canopies shade the rooms and terrace from harsh sunlight, which the architects claim is five times stronger than on the mainland.

Villa 921 by Harunatsu-Archi

During typhoons, the house and terrace can be screened behind protective screens, which fasten onto the protruding eaves.

Villa 921 by Harunatsu-Archi

Inside the house, rooms are divided into three rows and include a kitchen and bathroom on one side, a bedroom on the opposite side, and a living and a dining room in the centre.

Villa 921 by Harunatsu-Archi

The bedroom has two doors, so that one side can be converted into a children's room in the future.

Villa 921 by Harunatsu-Archi

"The usable area of the house only amounts to about 70 square metres," said architects Shoko Murakaji and Naoto Murakaji. "This is by no means large, but thanks to the amazing views of the landscape, there is never a feeling of narrowness."

Villa 921 by Harunatsu-Archi

Other Japanese houses we've featured include one that is extraordinarily narrow and one shaped liked an arrow.

Villa 921 by Harunatsu-Archi

See more stories about houses in Japan »

Villa 921 by Harunatsu-Archi

Photography is by Kai Nakamura.

Villa 921 by Harunatsu-Archi

Floor plan

Villa 921 by Harunatsu-Archi

Long section

Villa 921 by Harunatsu-Archi

Cross section

  • bubble

    Love the idea of using the tarp! I would prefer white color or some other bright color instead of black though. Thanks for sharing this house design.

  • yrag

    Want to raise buildings highly resistant to powerful winds? Then stop creating rectangular structures with large flat planes and large flat roof overhangs—you might as well be building masts to catch the wind and carry roofs off.