Höst by Norm Architects
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Höst Restaurant by Norm Architects

Norm Architects of Denmark used industrial pendant lights, woollen blankets and reclaimed wood to create rustic Scandinavian dining rooms at Höst, a new restaurant in Copenhagen.

Höst Restaurant by Norm Architects

Norm Architects collaborated with Danish designers Menu to create the spaces for restaurant brand Cofoco, which has nine other restaurants in the city, each with a unique design and menu.

Höst Restaurant by Norm Architects

For Höst, the designers tried to combine traditional Scandinavian cosiness with minimalism, incorporating weathered materials such as recycled wooden planks and pallets.

Höst Restaurant by Norm Architects

"The theme has been to transform the feeling of eating outside on a Scandinavian farmyard in rural settings to an urban and more minimalist indoor context," Jonas Bjerre-Poulsen told Dezeen.

Höst Restaurant by Norm Architects

Wooden shelving units screen a private dining area at the back of the restaurant, while reclaimed windows salvaged from an old hospital line the edge of a conservatory.

Höst Restaurant by Norm Architects

Dining areas also occupy the basement, where vintage wooden chopping boards hang from the walls and high-back chairs offer more comfortable seating.

Höst Restaurant by Norm Architects

The designers created a collection of tableware especially for the restaurant, which includes basic white plates and dishes, alongside blue and grey pieces and slabs of granite.

Höst Restaurant by Norm Architects

"We tried to see if we could find a balance where the interior, the dinnerware and the food told the same story, without it being too old-fashioned or too much of a theatrical backdrop," said Bjerre-Poulsen.

Höst Restaurant by Norm Architects

Stools designed by Norm Architects for &tradition sit beside the bar, while small pendant lights are clustered together to create a chandelier in the stairwell.

Höst Restaurant by Norm Architects

See also: our recent feature about Copenhagen eatery Noma, the best restaurant in the world, as well as two restaurants at Grand Hotel Stockholm in Sweden by Ilse Crawford.

Höst Restaurant by Norm Architects

See more restaurant and bar interiors »

Höst Restaurant by Norm Architects

Photography is by Jonas Bjerre-Poulsen.

Höst Restaurant by Norm Architects

Here's some information from Norm Architects:


Höst and New Norm Dinnerware – a symbiotic relation of contrasts Norm Architects and Danish designhouse Menu have joined forces with Copenhagen restaurateurs Cofoco, to create a distinctly urban restaurant with obvious romantic and rural references. Höst is an embodiment of the clash between romanticism and modernity.

Höst Restaurant by Norm Architects

A space of multiple stories intertwining and correlating to form an inspirational and aesthetic universe for all senses. An obvious and reoccurring characteristic of both concept and cooperation is the juxtaposition of elements. Höst is rustic gone simplistic. Rural gone urban. Past gone contemporary.

Höst Restaurant by Norm Architects

The classic virtues of Nordic cooking have found its contemporary counterpart at Höst. In the kitchen traditional ingredients are combined with the visions characterizing New Nordic Cuisine. And in the restaurant loads of green plants, woollen blankets and the warmth of used wooden planks soften and complement the tight no-nonsense architectural aesthetic so distinct for Norm.

Höst Restaurant by Norm Architects

Furthermore, Norm has ventured into sustainable interior design by implementing details such as cut-up Euro-pallets, vintage lamps and even windows from an old hospital. Norm and Menu have designed and produced New Norm Dinnerware exclusively for Höst, and if you dig deep you will find a hidden world of Scandinavian taste. On several levels modernity and interaction become evident in New Norm Dinnerware.

Höst Restaurant by Norm Architects

The multitude of parts, materials and colors provides numerous possibilities and expressions, and when you flip over certain parts, you will find an entry to www.newnorm.dk, an online inspirational universe of everything distinctly Scandinavian - from moods and designs to produce and recipes. The juxtapositions found throughout Höst and New Norm Dinnerware serve as the foundation for a symbiotic relation that comes to define what is “New Nordic”: A timeless aesthetic rooted in traditions and driven forward by visions.

  • alison

    Oh purleeeeeese, not another off-the-beaten-track-indie-DIY-industrial-lights-minimalist-rough-brick-wall-concrete-epoxy-coated-floor-recycled-timber-furniture-hence-must-be-cool-looking cafe?!

    • dirk

      Not another cynical comment.

  • Jac

    Please tell me the name and designer of the chair in the photos.

    • Martin

      There are three different ones, all Danish mid-century classics originally designed for FDB, the Danish Consumer’s Co-operative Society, and recently relaunched by HAY: J104 by Jørgen Bækmark, J77 by Folke Pålsson, and J110 by Poul H. Volther (the high back), http://hay.dk/#/site/products/chairs

  • zetre

    I don’t get the appeal of 19th century Scandinavian peasantry. Seems to have been mostly hardship, bad porridge and lack of opportunities to me.

  • Anon

    Whether it’s just another “must-be-cool-looking cafe” or not, it’s the details in the design that matter and make it different. I love the little candle holders floating on one of the walls. However, taste is different for everyone and you can’t like or agree with everything either.

  • Damian

    Does anyone know where the wall-mounted wardrobe is from?

  • Tamem

    I love the art of restraint here! It’s something a lot of designers have forgotten. It’s refreshing that they designed without their ego. Not like some of the other over the top designs that say “I’m so clever and so creative – look how amazing and different I can be!”

    We are bombarded by visual material all day – it’s a break from that. And remember how hard it is to make something seem so effortless.

  • duncan

    HI there, does anyone know where the scissor-action pendant lights come from please?