Trish House Yalding
by Matthew Heywood

| 6 comments
 

The facade of this black and white house by British architect Matthew Heywood is sliced up into irregular shapes to mimic the crooked angles of tree branches (+ slideshow).

Trish House Yalding by Matthew Heywood

Matthew Heywood wanted to create an affinity with the surrounding woodland when designing the five-bedroom property, located in a small village in Kent, England.

Trish House Yalding by Matthew Heywood

The architect used slanted columns - known as raking columns - to form the structure of the building, referencing criss-crossing branches and twigs.

Trish House Yalding by Matthew Heywood

"Large expanses of glass fill the gaps between the structure and allow you to appreciate the landscape and setting as if you were peering out from between the trunks and branches of the trees," explained Heywood.

Trish House Yalding by Matthew Heywood

The residence is clad in a mixture of black-stained and white-painted clapboard, which is commonly found on houses in this part of England. "The weatherboarding represents the foliage wrapping the building and enclosing the spaces within," Heywood said.

Trish House Yalding by Matthew Heywood

The monochrome colour palette continues inside the house with dark flooring, white walls and furnishings in shades of grey.

Trish House Yalding by Matthew Heywood

The ground floor of the property includes a large reception area with a suspended fireplace and sliding doors that open out onto the garden.

Trish House Yalding by Matthew Heywood

A staircase with a glass balustrade leads to the first floor, which accommodates five bedrooms, three bathrooms and a dressing room.

Trish House Yalding by Matthew Heywood

Matthew Heywood doesn't just work on buildings - the London-based architect previously tried his hand at redesigning London's buses.

Trish House Yalding by Matthew Heywood

Other British houses we've recently featured include a small wooden house on the Isle of Skye and a house with a mirrored facade that slides across to cover the windows. See all our stories about British houses »

Trish House Yalding by Matthew Heywood

Photography is by Jefferson Smith.

Trish House Yalding by Matthew Heywood

Engineer - Fothergill & Company
Main Contractor - Ecolibrium Solutions

Trish House Yalding by Matthew Heywood

Here's a description from the architect:


Trish House Yalding

The design of the house developed in direct response to the site and its location within the beautiful village of Yalding in Kent.

Trish House Yalding by Matthew Heywood

The building’s structure is composed to reflect the surrounding woodland with the raking columns representing the irregular angles of tree trunks and branches.

Trish House Yalding by Matthew Heywood

Large expanses of glass fill the gaps between the structure and allow you to appreciate the landscape and setting as if you were peering out from between the trunks and branches of the trees.

Trish House Yalding by Matthew Heywood

The traditional Kentish black and white weatherboarding represents the foliage wrapping the building and enclosing the spaces within. In contrast to the surrounding nature, the form and lines of the house are intentionally very geometric and crisp, creating a dialogue between the organic woodland and the modernist box.

Trish House Yalding by Matthew Heywood
Location plan - click for larger image
Trish House Yalding by Matthew Heywood
Ground floor plan - click for larger image
Trish House Yalding by Matthew Heywood
First floor plan - click for larger image
  • zizi

    “mimic the crooked angles of tree branches” Haha, yeah it’s the first thing that comes in mind looking at this house: “tree branches”. What an awful building.

    • Gary Walmsley

      Though I kind of like the house, I agree with zizi’s reaction to the architect’s absurd statement “mimic the crooked angles of tree branches”.

      In so many ways architect’s work should be seen, but their thoughts not heard, because under the pressure to say some meaningful or profound, they so often come off as the complete opposite. Frankly, this holds for the creative arts in general.

      And in the end, the work really does speak for itself. Words actual seem to cheapen and diminish it.

  • Man

    Detailing is a bit crude.

  • Suzie

    I love the angular shapes of the windows, especially in the night photos. The texture of the weatherboarding is also very beautiful.

  • chezliz

    Well done! This is perfect. Not only am I inspired looking at this house, but it has become my own personal dream house!

  • andi

    It’s a very nice project indeed for a freshman!