Door reinvented with folding mechanism
by Klemens Torggler

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This radical redesign of a door by Austrian artist Klemens Torggler uses a folding and pivoting system to collapse and roll to one side.

Evolution Door by Klemens Torggler

Instead of a single panel attached to a frame by two hinges, Torggler's Evolution Door folds into four triangular sections that collapse in on themselves and turn round before straightening back up into a rectangle.

Evolution Door reinvented with folding mechanism by Klemens Torggler

Two halves of the door are attached by pivots at the bottom and top of the frame and a hinge in the middle.

Evolution Door reinvented with folding mechanism by Klemens Torggler

By gently pulling at the joint that connects the two middle panels together, the door folds and slides across the entrance.

Evolution Door reinvented with folding mechanism by Klemens Torggler

"The special construction makes it possible to move the door sideways without the use of tracks," explained Torggler. "This technical trick opens up new applications for the door."

Evolution Door reinvented with folding mechanism by Klemens Torggler

Torggler calls the system Drehplattentür, which translates as the "flip panel door". The artist, based in Vienna, has been working on the concept for a number of years with a series of distinct iterations.

Evolution Door reinvented with folding mechanism by Klemens Torggler

His earliest designs used two metal rods to connect two square panels that would separate then converge in one motion. He developed a second technique that used a cut-out epitrochoid curve with a wheel track that allowed the two panels to move more fluidly than his previous design. The triangular design is his latest.

Evolution Door reinvented with folding mechanism by Klemens Torggler

Torggler has experimented with glass, wood and metal, as well as creating larger double doors and screens to separate entire rooms.

Evolution Door reinvented with folding mechanism by Klemens Torggler

Currently the Evolution Door is a prototype, however a selection of his earlier versions have been made available through website Artelier Contemporary.

  • jl

    Bye bye fingers.

  • Paramount Interiors

    What would happen if there was a fire and you have to get out of the door quickly, it doesn’t look like it would move quick enough?

    • omnomnicrom

      Don’t use it as a fire door then.

  • Ton

    Another model, but maybe it goes for the question of opening from other side:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_XOCDLrfwh8

  • izobelo

    Very good for sound and draft insulation I presume?!

  • H-J

    An artist made a beautiful new kind of door and people here are complaining about fire safety or how to open the door from the other side or sound and draft insulation. Who gives a s***!

    • Jauma_catalunya

      You! If you are on the other side of the door and the fire is burning your…

      • Perspective

        You would do the exact same from the other side of the door. You would push it a bit away from yourself, and the rest follows – it tilts slightly and folds to open up.

    • Concerned Citizen

      Sadly, only the intelligent people care. They understand how a door must function, and that it cannot be merely artsy fartsy.

  • robert

    Door is ingenious. Kindly fix the floor.

  • Perspective

    You would do the exact same from the other side of the door. You would push it a bit away from yourself, and the rest follows – it tilts slightly and folds to open up.

  • Daniel Brown

    How do you close it from the other side?

  • Concerned Citizen

    Obviously, it is intended as a curiosity, and not as a functioning door. Egress doors can only be side-swinging. This door does not meet ADA requirements. It appears that it will bar neither sound nor weather nor invasion. So, take it for what it is: a piece of art that should be never put across an opening functioning as a door.

  • 1955 The Keeper

    It appears to have the practicality of those old “Hippie” room/door dividers from the 60s which were made up of strands of glass beads, paperclips, or tiny sea shells strung together. Novel concept. A bit stark in solid black. Maybe a long piece of art work like an Andy Warhol or similar ilk would look better.