Futuristic family home by Gonzalo Vaíllo Martínez
based on biogenetic forms

| 30 comments

This conceptual design for a family home by postgraduate architecture student Gonzalo Vaíllo Martínez features a fluid structural frame, a skeletal staircase and a skin incorporating blinds that open and close like gills (+ movie).

Futuristic family home featuring skeletal staircase by Gonzalo Vaíllo Martínez

Starting with the standard functional spaces required by a single family residence, Vaíllo Martínez based the form of the house on scientific advances in fields such as microcellular systems and biogenetics.

Futuristic family home featuring skeletal staircase by Gonzalo Vaíllo Martínez

"Everyone has in mind what the standards of a normal house are today," Vaíllo Martínez told Dezeen. "They are the principles established in Modernism, where spaces were separated by function and the aim was how to relate these spaces to one other and the surroundings."

Futuristic family home featuring skeletal staircase by Gonzalo Vaíllo Martínez

"This project is based on this distribution of the program in a very simple but strict way," he continued. "The house is an exercise in blending a much more complex, multiple and emotive architectural language with a common single family house program."

Futuristic family home featuring skeletal staircase by Gonzalo Vaíllo Martínez

Designed as a modular system that can be adapted to any site, this version of the house was developed for a sloping plot at 2217 Neutra Place in California, which is located between two houses designed by Modernist architect Richard Neutra. Vaíllo Martínez feels these houses represent the outmoded typologies of twentieth century architecture.

Futuristic family home featuring skeletal staircase by Gonzalo Vaíllo Martínez

"When the system is moved into a real location it evolves and mutates according to the constraints defined by the surroundings," he explained. "It can be placed anywhere and the specific conditions of each location will modify the house in one way or another."

Futuristic family home featuring skeletal staircase by Gonzalo Vaíllo Martínez

The house comprises three interconnected units, with an entrance leading to pods containing various services which are partially submerged in the hillside and connected to the main living areas below by a fluid staircase.

Futuristic family home featuring skeletal staircase by Gonzalo Vaíllo Martínez

A third unit housing the bedrooms and a terrace is detached from the main structure and raised above the ground at the bottom of the site.

Futuristic family home featuring skeletal staircase by Gonzalo Vaíllo Martínez

Using 3D computer modelling processes that enable surfaces to expand, contract and respond to different parameters, the shape of the house was animated and deformed to match the topography of the site.

Futuristic family home featuring skeletal staircase by Gonzalo Vaíllo Martínez

The fluid skeleton is intended to be constructed from structural concrete, with the complex facade panels and tangled supporting framework produced using 3D printing processes.

Futuristic family home featuring skeletal staircase by Gonzalo Vaíllo Martínez

Organic louvred panels incorporated into the building's skin open and close like gills, while other openings stretch and widen to adjust the amount of light entering the interior.

Futuristic family home featuring skeletal staircase by Gonzalo Vaíllo Martínez

Vaíllo Martínez suggested that, although the building may appear unrealistic, it could be constructed today using contemporary technologies and manufacturing methods.

Futuristic family home featuring skeletal staircase by Gonzalo Vaíllo Martínez

"We have more than enough technology not only to design projects such as this one, but also to materialise them," he claimed. "This is not science fiction or something possible in the near future, it is possible today if we push the boundaries of the resources we have now. Budget is another issue."

Futuristic family home featuring skeletal staircase by Gonzalo Vaíllo Martínez

The project was developed by Vaíllo Martínez during his postgraduate studies at the University of Applied Arts Vienna, and follows his proposal for a cave-like auditorium for the Tate Modern gallery which he designed as an undergraduate at Spain's Universidad de Alcalá.

Here's some more information from Vaíllo Martínez:


2217NPL House,  Gonzalo Vaíllo Martínez

Located in the outskirts of Los Angeles, the starting point of the design is based on the standards of a single family house. The exuberance of the form is the tool that develops an aesthetic able to corrupt the original principles and establish a negotiation with the contemporary way of life in a day-by-day house.

Futuristic family home featuring skeletal staircase by Gonzalo Vaíllo Martínez
Ground floor plan - click for larger image

The project is thought as a continuous mixture of conventional elements that create an emotional empathy with something that is familiar for everyone (social memory), combined with external contaminations that brings new behaviors and perceptions of the spaces.

Futuristic family home featuring skeletal staircase by Gonzalo Vaíllo Martínez
First floor plan - click for larger image

The house is divided into three units. The first one is a half-underground piece, which contains the main entrance and the services of the house. The public areas are located in the second one (on the ground) and in the last one appears the private rooms, which detach from the ground. In this way, the three units are positioned in the same height and it is the relationship with the sloped topography that defines each piece structurally.

Futuristic family home featuring skeletal staircase by Gonzalo Vaíllo Martínez
Roof plan - click for larger image

The aggressive exterior made out of the combination of a wire-linework, mobile facade panels and metallic surfaces, creates a contrast with the soft and continuous interiors.

Futuristic family home featuring skeletal staircase by Gonzalo Vaíllo Martínez
Section - click for larger image
  • adam

    Err.

  • Andrea

    What is the problem that this “futuristic” house try to solves?

  • fran

    Nightmare.

  • Dan

    It’s like a house designed by Hansruedi Giger!

    • UniRes

      A family home… For a family of aliens? I can hear the children’s screams already.

  • roelatmac

    Andrea: think harder.

  • Rederic

    Tries too hard to be edgy. Cool for the sake of cool regardless of the “intellectual” basis.

  • Tupi

    If my neighbours were to build that next to my house, I’d sue them for deliberately devaluing the neighbourhood.

  • Perez

    Just another architect avoiding having to build architecture.

  • Tim

    Let’s 3D print it!

  • Raving Elk

    When a new language is created just for the sake of itself, you get something like this.

    Anyway, this might be the future Addams family home!

  • ScottW315

    So where are those of us who would prefer not to live in a whale’s uterus supposed to go?

    • archiwhat

      Next door.

  • John

    This project seems to be an academic exercise conducted by a postgraduate student – not real world architecture – so why treat it as such? At no point in the article does Mr Martinez state that he would like to ‘solve problems’ with this house and his modus operandi seems to centre around his desire to push current technologies to try and create a house that enhances contemporary living.

    To my mind he is doing what all good academics should be doing and I congratulate him for exploring the ordinary from a new angle.

    • oldschool

      Well, I think the point of exploring residential construction from “a new angle” is pretty debatable.

      People have been exploring this kind of empty formalism since the 90′s. The tools now are much better, but the underlying ideas are very, very similar.

  • Михал Куница

    “The project is thought as a continuous mixture of conventional elements that create an emotional empathy with something that is familiar for everyone.” – like nightmares.

  • oldschool

    He definitely has a future in Hollywood.

  • Z-dog

    If built, this would be one of the most groundbreaking houses of all time. It would be like haute-fashion – beyond use in many ways but also representative of a direction.

    If it worked in some sort of homely fashion, I could definitely imagine people living in it. It might not be comfortable but it would be a beautiful expression.

    Leave the ‘problem’ solving to the problem-solvers and the dreaming to the dreamers.

    • http://intrivia.co.uk/ Robert

      Let the problem solvers become architects, and the dreamers become artists. There is a place for everybody.

  • Tyler

    This thing looks like a rotting fish. So much so, that I can’t read this post and eat my lunch at the same time.

  • Geoff

    Something tells me his post grad professor was Hernan Diaz Alonso. It screams of his formalism and his idea of the “grotesque”.

  • longarche

    It looks like H.R. Giger threw up. But I appreciate the concept of letting organic processes create organic spaces, defying the 90-degree angle. Perhaps the processes need a little more direction.

  • Treelove

    Fantastic design! Please, never build it!

  • Mel

    This is completely without logic.

  • nn

    Tripophobia.

  • picka

    Don’t be afraid of your future.

  • Chris

    Will become known as Roadkill House.

  • michael

    Not a cupboard in sight.

  • blobface

    If this is the work of a concept artist for a sci-fi film, you’d probably shrug and think… Nice? Looks like student work, very skilful renders, some elements might be cool for a dystopian sci-fi film, but the second it’s meant to be architecture / landscape urbanism, we’re suppose to take it seriously?

    An academic architecture student doing this is equivalent to a medical student devoting his entire masters hypothesising how to treat skin disease for a race of calcium based lifeforms in alpha centauri (and yes, if such lifeform existed, I’m 78% sure they’d have skin) and then to have the study featured on a medical journal.

    I’m sure it’d be fascinating, but surely time could be better spent doing something that might actually help us? Architecture’s meant to be a useful profession, not masturbation.

  • lolitecture

    H.R. Giger called… he wants his concept back.