Aluminium panels open like flower buds
on warehouse facade by Brisac Gonzalez

| 4 comments
 

Pointy panels appear to be cracking open on the facade of this storage depot in France by Brisac Gonzalez, revealing flashes of red, lilac, pink and turquoise (+ slideshow).

Aluminium clad storage depot in Aurillac, France, by Brisac Gonzalez

London studio Brisac Gonzalez designed the seven-metre-high Techno-Prisme to provide a storage facility for the Le Prisme Concert Hall in Aurillac – a theatre and events venue completed by the architects in 2007.

Aluminium clad storage depot in Aurillac, France, by Brisac Gonzalez

The back-lit glass diamonds that characterise the facade of the concert hall offered a starting point for the new structure. While this surface only comes to life after dark, the new building shows its colours during daylight hours.

Aluminium clad storage depot in Aurillac, France, by Brisac Gonzalez

"It was really a response to the original building," studio co-founder Cécile Brisac told Dezeen. "It is a daytime version of that night facade, giving the site a metallic colour during the day."

Aluminium clad storage depot in Aurillac, France, by Brisac Gonzalez

Each of the pyramid-shaped panels was custom-made from aluminium. Some are closed, but others appear to to be slowly opening, like blossoming flower buds.

Aluminium clad storage depot in Aurillac, France, by Brisac Gonzalez

The colours revealed inside are clustered together across the walls, mimicking the colour palette of the illuminated glass.

Aluminium clad storage depot in Aurillac, France, by Brisac Gonzalez

Behind the decorative facade, the building has a standard steel structure infilled with prefabricated concrete panels. Insulation was added outside the structure to maintain a stable indoor climate.

Aluminium clad storage depot in Aurillac, France, by Brisac Gonzalez

Two five-metre-high doors provide access inside, allowing enough room for forklift trucks to enter. The space is used for storing extra seating and stage equipment.

Photography is by Thierry Ols.

Aluminium clad storage depot in Aurillac, France, by Brisac Gonzalez
Site plan - click for larger image
Aluminium clad storage depot in Aurillac, France, by Brisac Gonzalez
Floor plan - click for larger image
Aluminium clad storage depot in Aurillac, France, by Brisac Gonzalez
Section - click for larger image
Aluminium clad storage depot in Aurillac, France, by Brisac Gonzalez
North elevation - click for larger image
Aluminium clad storage depot in Aurillac, France, by Brisac Gonzalez
South elevation - click for larger image
Aluminium clad storage depot in Aurillac, France, by Brisac Gonzalez
Facade strategy diagram - click for larger image
  • Steve

    These panels neither blossom or open. A simple fixed and stationary aluminium panel with a somewhat unique shape. A far cry from the dynamic “opening like a blossom”. Nice design, but a weak headline.

  • Colonel Pancake

    I would encourage people to take a look at the contrived complexity of this gimmicky, artificial facade and compare it to the authentic complexity and rusticism of the aged shingles on Zumthor’s St. Benedikt’s chapel. With the former paling in comparison by an infinite margin, might we simply ask the architect of this piece of junk what was so insufficient about a renewable, sustainable, biodegradable, and beautiful material like wood shingles? Was the architect simply worried wood shingles wouldn’t make him look creative enough?

  • Z-dog

    I think this is a nice design. An opening facade really makes things very complicated and very expensive. Let’s not forget that what we have here is a storage building – not a theatre or library.

    Compared to Heathwick’s weaved facade, I think this stands up. I wouldn’t compare it to timber shingles. I would compare it to Kohn’s Barcelona apartment floor… I wouldn’t compare it to a flower.

    We should applaud the architecture of these non-spaces rather than attack them.

  • spadestick

    I’m impressed with this treatment – at first glance you would think it is a rendering. The way it looks makes you think it is a photorealistic 3D rendering. I had to rub my eyes and scan the facade REALLY carefully and then slowly decide that it was the real thing. Honestly, good job on fooling our perceptions. It is difficult to achieve that nowadays.