Schemata Architects adds needle-like pendants
and mirrors to Phillip Lim pop-up shop

| 2 comments
 

Japanese studio Schemata Architects has used mirrored surfaces to create a dizzying environment for this pop-up store in Tokyo, designed for fashion brand 3.1 Phillip Lim (+ slideshow).

Philip Lim pop up store by Schemata Architects

The 68.2 square metre space, on the third floor of Isetan department store in Shinjuku, Tokyo, is enclosed between two curved structures – one for hanging clothes, and the other housing a stock room and fitting room.

Philip Lim pop up store by Schemata Architects

Between these, Schemata has arranged mirrored fixtures symmetrically, which create multiple reflections in the space. Two large square mirrors face each other in the centre, and mirrored circular display plinths are arranged between these.

Philip Lim pop up store by Schemata Architects

The glass-topped plinths also have coiled lights inside them, and the ceiling above is fitted with needle-like pendant lights, amplifying the reflective quality of the space.

Philip Lim pop up store by Schemata Architects

The design responds to a conceptual brief from 3.1 Phillip Lim, which gave the architects a number of opposing words, such as youth/elegance, and luxury/pragmatic. Rather than interpret these as opposite forces, Schemata decided to fuse them together.

Philip Lim pop up store by Schemata Architects

"First, we divided the space into two zones, to emphasise the relationship of A and B," explained studio principal Jo Nagasaka. "Then we connected the two zones using mirrors. When you enter inside the shop, real images and reflected images merge into each other to create a new relationship, that is A and B at the same time."

Philip Lim pop up store by Schemata Architects

The design is one of five that Schemata Architects is designing for 3.1 Phillip Lim in the pop-up space over six months. Each design will reflect a different theme, ranging from nature to neo-industrial rave.

Philip Lim pop up store by Schemata Architects

Other designers commissioned by New York designer Phillip Lim to create boutiques for his fashion brand include American studio Leong Leong, who designed a flagship store for Seoul, and Japanese studio Jamo Associates, who developed the Tokyo store.

Photography is by Takumi Ota.

Here is some more text from Schemata Architects:


3.1 Phillip Lim Microcosm

This is 3.1 Phillip Lim 2014 Pop- Up store at Shinjuku Isetan, which opens from April 2014 for six months.

Philip Lim pop up store by Schemata Architects

This time the shop is located on the third floor of the department store, which had a space with a strong character. We attempt to make five renewals in 6 months, and at this stage we have done two renewals.

Philip Lim pop up store by Schemata Architects

In this project, we focus on the brand philosophy of 3.1 Phillip Lim. Several sets of "almost" opposing words are given. "Almost" is the keyword that represents the wide scope of their design directions, and also it liberates their ways of thinking. The keywords are as follows:

Dynamic/Effortless
Youth/Elegance
Classic/Madness
Luxury/Pragmatic
Youth/Elegance

The last set of words is most important for him.

Philip Lim pop up store by Schemata Architects

We translate the philosophy not into words but into forms in space. We interpret the words not in opposing relationship such as "A versus B", but re-interpret them as "A and B at the same time". And we expect that something new will emerge from the new relationship.

Philip Lim pop up store by Schemata Architects

First we divide the space into two zones to emphasise the relationship of A and B. Then we connected the two zones using mirrors. When you enter inside the shop, real images and reflected images merge into each other to create a new relationship that is "A and B at the same time".

Title: 3.1 Phillip Lim Microcosm
architects: Jo Nagasaka/Schemata Architects
Project team: Masami Nakata/Schemata Architects
Usage: pop-up store
Construction: TANK
Floor area: 68.2 sqm

  • Christopher Goldman Ward

    Design defeats garment.

    • davvid

      Maybe it only seems that way because you’re experiencing this project through the frame of architectural photography. I can imagine that a photographer could take a series of shots that isolate and emphasise the clothing or the patrons or any other aspect.