House of the Infinite by Alberto Campo Baeza
designed as "a jetty facing out to sea"

| 16 comments
 

The expansive roof of this seaside house in Cádiz, Spain, by Alberto Campo Baeza stretches out towards the shoreline like a flattened extension of the rugged terrain (+ slideshow).

House of the Infinite by Alberto Campo Baeza designed as "a jetty facing out to sea"

VT House, also known as "house of the infinite", was conceived by Spanish architect Alberto Campo Baeza first and foremost as a piece of landscape architecture, with its architectural elements sunken underneath.

House of the Infinite by Alberto Campo Baeza designed as "a jetty facing out to sea"

"We have erected a house as if it were a jetty facing out to sea," said the architect. "On this resoundingly horizontal plane, bare and denuded, we face out to the distant horizon."

House of the Infinite by Alberto Campo Baeza designed as "a jetty facing out to sea"



The building comprises a bulky rectangular box, 20 metres wide and 36 metres deep, although the extensive upper terrace gives the impression that the structure is much larger.

House of the Infinite by Alberto Campo Baeza designed as "a jetty facing out to sea"

Two storeys are housed beneath the rooftop plane. The front half of these floors emerges from the terrain to meet the beach, while the rear half was created by excavating 12 metres into the rock.

House of the Infinite by Alberto Campo Baeza designed as "a jetty facing out to sea"

The entire structure was built from travertine stone, which Campo Baeza describes as a reference to Cádiz's Roman heritage.

House of the Infinite by Alberto Campo Baeza designed as "a jetty facing out to sea"

"The Romans were there a handful of centuries ago," he explained. "Bolonia, the ruins of the Roman fishing factories where they produced garum and built temples to their gods, is just a stone's throw away."

House of the Infinite by Alberto Campo Baeza designed as "a jetty facing out to sea"

"In their honour we have built our house, like an acropolis in stone, in Roman travertine," he added.

House of the Infinite by Alberto Campo Baeza designed as "a jetty facing out to sea"

A monumental wall marks the boundary line between the landscape and the terrace. Beyond this, a swimming pool is sunken into the surface, while a grand staircase leads down inside the house.

House of the Infinite by Alberto Campo Baeza designed as "a jetty facing out to sea"

The upper level of the building contains rooms dedicated to socialising, including a living room with a circular skylight overhead and a covered balcony in front. This leads through to a simple kitchen with a large dining area.

House of the Infinite by Alberto Campo Baeza designed as "a jetty facing out to sea"

The lowest level accommodates a series of en-suite bedrooms, positioned on either side of a communal central space that leads straight out to the beach.

House of the Infinite by Alberto Campo Baeza designed as "a jetty facing out to sea"

Campo Baeza, whose past projects include a walled house for a poet and a hilltop home with a bulky concrete structure, describes the building as " the most radical house we have ever made".

House of the Infinite by Alberto Campo Baeza designed as "a jetty facing out to sea"

"On a marvellous place like a piece of earthly paradise, at Cádiz, we have built an infinite plane facing the infinite sea," he said.

House of the Infinite by Alberto Campo Baeza designed as "a jetty facing out to sea"

Photography is by Javier Callejas.

House of the Infinite by Alberto Campo Baeza designed as "a jetty facing out to sea"
Roof plan - click for larger image
House of the Infinite by Alberto Campo Baeza designed as "a jetty facing out to sea"
Upper floor plan - click for larger image
House of the Infinite by Alberto Campo Baeza designed as "a jetty facing out to sea"
Lower floor plan - click for larger image
House of the Infinite by Alberto Campo Baeza designed as "a jetty facing out to sea"
Long section
House of the Infinite by Alberto Campo Baeza designed as "a jetty facing out to sea"
Side elevation
  • Colonel Pancake

    It could use a Scarface poster.

  • Manuel

    Nice but I wonder how he got through Spanish regulations. You are not allowed to build so close to the sea anymore, and you cannot avoid railings in the upper terrace (people falling). I can understand that the railings will be placed after the pictures have been taken, but not the other.

    • mitate

      Siting it further back and higher up made most sense. A better sea view, and all that rock left as nature intended.

    • mrswoo

      I was wondering about the lack of railings – that would certainly mean a closing order over here in the UK.

    • pepillo

      That all depends who you know and how much you pay under the table, my lovely Spain.

    • ght

      Regarding railings, it’s a private house not a public building. You don’t need them if you don’t want to. De Blas house still has no railings. The problem would probably appear if you want to insure the house. You would have to negotiate this with the insurance company.

  • Anne

    Shame, shouldn’t be okay to build on the beach…. really bad integration.

  • TFO

    The ghost of Case Malaparte lives on, but it never quite reaches the same quintessence. Perhaps the opulence here is actually a detractor from connecting to the elemental here.

  • André cast

    Inspired in Continuous monument of Superstudio?

  • vktr

    The site was much better without the building (regardless of its quality). It should not be allowed to build there and the architect should think twice before doing it. It may be legal if it is more than 100 metres away from the shoreline, but it is morally wrong to do it there. If more neighbours decide to build as well it will be the end for Bolonia.

  • Ghostdog

    Some architects can work way above the zoning law.

  • papou

    It is at least great architecture, and it respects the horizon and the setting much more than many other architectures…

  • Dave Carcamano

    So incredibly boring.

  • Michele Pappagallo

    I just do not understand. What is the sense in showing such minimal architecture without any rails, when you will be forced into using them afterwards by safety laws. Yes, Baeza got nice “pure” pics but it is simply unreal.
    Nice usage of materials and color palette; despite the fact that we are extremely close to the water, almost by it, the villa really mimics the shore.

  • Fling

    What an insult to landscape architecture; a clumsy, scaleless, and bombastic exhibitionism.

  • txema ybarra

    Two facts: this beautiful house was built instead of another one, quite old (and ugly); the rails were taken out for the picture.

    http://fueradeserie.expansion.com/2014/06/02/arquitectura/1401709844.html