Bridal Veil installation by Louis Sicard creates
a curtain of water through the forest

| 6 comments
 

A veil of water stretches 40 metres between the trees of a wood in central France to form this installation by French architect Louis Sicard (+ slideshow).

Bridal Veil by Louis Sicard

Louis Sicard worked with fellow architect Emil Yusta and carpenter Thorsten Fischer to design and build a pine and copia timber structure that carries a channel similar to an aqueduct, which zigzags through the woodland in France's Sancy region.



"The waterfall is called the Bridal Veil for its delicate appearance, its uniform distribution on a deposit of volcanic ash," Sicard told Dezeen.

Bridal Veil by Louis Sicard

The installation was created for this year's Horizons Sancy art and nature festival, which features a series of artworks across the region and also includes a slatted wooden structure on top of a mountain.

Bridal Veil by Louis Sicard

The base of the covered triangular channel is perforated with 4000 holes filled with small pipes, which let water pour through to form a vertical screen of water.

Bridal Veil by Louis Sicard

"When the sun is up, lights and shadows of the forest and reflections of the water finally complete the magical scene of the waterfall," Sicard said.

Bridal Veil by Louis Sicard

The aqueous curtain starts at the Rossignolet waterfall, spanning the river in front of the cascade and turning to cross a pathway.

Visitors can walk through the water, choosing to either get wet or stay dry by passing under with a handheld wooden shelter.

Bridal Veil by Louis Sicard

"From the first sketches of the projects the idea was to use the water and its characteristic as the main component of the installation," said Sicard. "The fresh sound of the source plays with the multiple reflections and transparency of the water.

Bridal Veil by Louis Sicard

At one end of the structure, a reservoir collects water from the falls and regulates the amount that can pass into the channel.

A filter prevents particles from continuing with the flow, so they won't fall on visitor's heads.

Bridal Veil by Louis Sicard

The slender timber posts supporting the aqueduct create long shadows that mimic those cast by the tall trees.

Bridal Veil by Louis Sicard

The Horizons Sancy festival takes place every year. For the 2012 festival, another waterfall installation comprised a series of triangular sections that interrupted the flow of falling water.

  • Chris

    How awesomely original. An aqueduct. Didn’t the Romans do this thousands of years ago? Oh I see this one is original because it is a LEAKY aqueduct built over a beautiful stream or river. Didn’t the stream or river waterfall look good enough?

  • Chris

    My design qualifier always boils down to:
    does it need to exist?

    • janine

      So, a list of your designs? So we can decide what needs to exist.

      • Chris

        Oooh you got me, I design advertising and packaging for garbage products like those found here, and yes none of it needs to exist.

        Humans are all about changing things just for the sake of having done so, with no regard to cost of consequences in the future. Take this aqueduct for example, who pays to take it apart. What damage was done to the area in it’s building and de-construction. Damage to the area due to additional, unnecessary human traffic. I am no better but that doesn’t mean that any of this should be encouraged without thinking about the consequences of unnecessary ego design. The toxic need to entertain and attract customers.

        • Romain_M

          I applaud your sincerity! Perhaps you could see it this way: the installation gives volume to an otherwise “flat” natural event.

          The repercussions can be appreciated differently, maybe the work changes the “sound-profile” of the brook attracting trekkers from afar. I even wonder whether it changes the ecology of the site by influencing the humidity levels of the surroundings (micro-droplets and all that jazz).

          Granted, this all seems rather superfluous, but it does have poetic merit.

  • Romain_M

    That hand-held wooden shelter is just silly… I’d like to share a Pastis with the architect and let him delight me with his gentle humour.

    The device deserves a fastidious technical name. Precipitating Water Ligneous Deflector, or PWaLD.