Timber frame surrounding Heri & Salli's Office Off
transforms the building into a climbing frame

| 5 comments
 

A gridded timber frame extends around the exterior of this office for a cladding company by Austrian studio Heri & Salli, providing space to test facades, as well as to hang sun-screens or grow plants (+ slideshow).

Office Off by Heri & Salli

Office Off was designed for cladding company Face of Buildings in the Austrian state of Burgenland.



The company asked for a building with a simple character and leisure space, so Heri & Salli extended the frame outside to create a grid that employees can climb on and customise.

Office Off by Heri & Salli

"The grid represents the possibility of space – the coordinates of possible expansion," architect Josef Saller told Dezeen. "Architecture should not be a finished, dead monument. It should be a spatial sequence that people start to occupy."

Office Off by Heri & Salli

The three-storey office houses approximately 25 workers, who were all consulted during the design process, and has been built to support working and living activities.

In addition to meeting rooms and work spaces, it features a gym, a climbing wall in a three-storey-high entrance atrium, a swimming pool, and an allotment and farm planned for the surrounding land.

Office Off by Heri & Salli

"From the beginning, the concept of quality of life and leisure culture had a major part in the planning. The traditional aspect of 'going to work' has received minor consideration," said Saller.

Office Off by Heri & Salli

The building's folded form was partly inspired by crumpled paper, and designed to offer a looser sense of enclosure, with strips of glazing closing up the gaps between the walls.

Office Off by Heri & Salli

Window boxes punch out of the walls on all sides, providing additional office space and relaxation areas, and framing views of the surrounding forest.

Office Off by Heri & Salli

The building was constructed entirely from wood, and the outer shell was built with prefabricated panels and erected on site in five days.

Office Off by Heri & Salli

Cedar shingles clad the exterior walls, while the window boxes were covered in Alucobond – a kind of flat aluminium composite panel. The interior was lined in spruce.

Office Off by Heri & Salli

Office space spreads across the building's three floors and toilets have been concentrated in the centre of each storey. The ground floor also accommodates a kitchen, while the top floor has two small bunk rooms for resting.

Office Off by Heri & Salli

The roof has 85 per cent of its surface covered in photovoltaic solar panels, which provide all the building's electricity, and the heating system is powered by wood from local farmers.

An underground tank collects rainwater that can be used for gardening, toilets and showering, and a system has been installed to automatically open or close windows based on temperature.

Office Off by Heri & Salli

Photography is by Paul Ott.


Project credits

Detail planning: RWT plus ZT GmbH
Construction planning: Architekturbüro Piniel, FOB, Heri & Salli
Wood construction: Holzbau Oswald GmbH
Metal work/furniture: StahlundForm
Builder: Pfnier & Co GmbH
Building physics: Dr. Pfeiler GmbH
Building services: Karner Haustechnik GmbH
Electric: Elektro Heißenberger
Facade: Alu König Stahl
Panel-beater: Spenglerei + Glaserei Moser GmbH
Elevator: Aufzüge Friedl GmbH

Office Off by Heri & Salli
Site plan – click for larger image
Office Off by Heri & Salli
Ground floor plan – click for larger image
Office Off by Heri & Salli
First floor plan – click for larger image
Office Off by Heri & Salli
Second floor plan – click for larger image
Office Off by Heri & Salli
Section one – click for larger image
Office Off by Heri & Salli
Section two – click for larger image
  • Rutger

    A very cool conceptual piece of work, made totally ridiculous by posing people on it.

  • Jimmy

    The building would look better without the silly frame. Let’s be honest, no single employee will ever use it for “climbing”, seriously. I hate those conceptual, hey-let’s-do-something-completely-ridiculous-so-we-will-make-it-into-the-magazines, architectural add-ons that don’t make any sense whatsoever.

    Sigh. Architecture is dead and no one will attend its funeral.

    • Goody Gum Drops

      The author probably should have put the bit about the cladding company owners using the frame to test facades further up the article. It gets a bit lost in the first sentence.

      • Jimmy

        The frame is too big to be used for testing. The measurements are not practical. Trust me, it will never be used for testing purposes.

  • Marcus Des

    Proof that deconstructivist architecture is very much alive and kicking, but no need to explain it as something it is not. This is not a playground or climbing installation.