Water=Life by Arik Levy

Water=Life by Arik Levy

Designer Arik Levy presents a pebble-shaped device for opening water bottles at Maison&Objet in Paris this week.

Water=Life by Arik Levy

Called Water=Life, the object fits over the top of a water bottle, gripping the cap's ridges with its teeth to create a larger handle with more leverage.

Water=Life by Arik Levy

The natural pebble shape means it sits discretely on the table when not in use.

Water=Life by Arik Levy

Levy created the device for inclusive products company Omabia.

Water=Life by Arik Levy

He seems to have a thing about water at the moment - check out his Well of Life lamp here and see all our stories about his work here.

Water=Life by Arik Levy

Here's some text for Arik Levy:


Water=Life is a techno-poetic project where design meets everyday needs. For his cooperation with Omabia, an organization whose objectives are to improve our everyday life, Arik Levy has come up with a simple, poetic and functional concept to facilitate and improve access to water and other drinks.  We all experience situations such as hearing a child say : ‘Papa can you open the bottle for me’, or witnessing an aged person having the same problem. It is sad to see that a very simple task such as opening a bottle of water or soft drinks can be difficult and unsolved. Sometimes I also have to make a big effort myself.

I wanted to create an enigmatic object that does not give itself away too fast and of which one can appreciate the appearance as well as the functionality. A river-stone was the inspiration. Water comes from the rocks and in this case it’s a river-stone that gives us access to water.  By simply placing the river-stone on the screw-cup lead of the bottle, the cone with its multiple radial pressure lines serves as a hooking device. Applying a very minor pressure and turning the river-stone form allows you to benefit from a greater leverage and extra force so as to snap the lead security band open with no effort.

Once the river-stone is put back on the table, it goes back to being an object of nature and becomes part of a metaphor.