IKEA spoofs Apple with launch of "Bookbook" – its new print catalogue

News: the catalogue for IKEA's 2015 collection is presented as if it were the latest tech offering from Apple in this short movie revealed on one of the Swedish homeware brand's YouTube channels.

Created by ad agency BBH, the spoof-style movie announces the launch of the IKEA "bookbook" – a 328-page catalogue that includes features such as "eternal battery life" and "tactile touch technology".

Ikea spoofs Apple with launch of "Bookbook" – its new catalogue

"Once in a while, something comes along that changes the way we live, a device so simple and intuitive, using it feels almost familiar," says Jorgen Eghammer, the "chief design guru" in the two-minute video.

"Introducing the 2015 IKEA catalog. It's not a digital book or an e-book. It's a book book."

Ikea spoofs Apple with launch of "Bookbook" – its new catalogue

The advert is shot against a clean white background, emulating the way Apple presents its new products, and the catalogue is shown turning slowly in mid-air to show it off from every angle.

Ikea spoofs Apple with launch of "Bookbook" – its new catalogue

Eghammer goes on to explain how to "navigate" the product: "Content comes pre-installed via 328 high-definition pages of inspiring furnishing ideas. To start browsing, simply touch and grab. Right to left to move forwards, left to right to move backwards."

Features are demonstrated by a pair of anonymous hands, alongside digital graphics that illustrate the specifications of the catalogue.

Ikea spoofs Apple with launch of "Bookbook" – its new catalogue

According to Eghammer, the product can be "downloaded into your mail box – the one you open with a key", for no cost.

"At IKEA we believe technology this life enhancing should be in the hands of everyone, so this is why the 2015 IKEA catalogue is free," he says.

Ikea spoofs Apple with launch of "Bookbook" – its new catalogue

The video was posted on IKEA Singapore's YouTube page yesterday and at time of press had seen more than 700,000 plays.