Ercol updates mid-century designs using millennial pink tones
Ercol has given a millennial pink makeover to two of its original designs originally created by founder Lucian Ercolani in the 1950s.

Ercol updates mid-century designs using millennial pink tones

Ercol has given a millennial pink makeover to two of its original designs originally created by founder Lucian Ercolani in the 1950s.

Debuted last week at Paris trade fair Maison&Objet, the collection is made up of two of Ercolani's mid-century designs – the Loveseat and the Butterfly chair.

Collectively named Half-Rose Originals, the two-piece furniture collection has been updated in a shade of so-called millennial pink – a trend which has seen many architects and designers apply a blush tone to their products.

"The Half-Rose Loveseat and Butterfly Chair feature a striking dip-dye effect that accentuates the crafted design of these two iconic pieces," said Ercol.

The Loveseat, which was originally designed in 1943 by Ercolani as a production-friendly version of the classic Windsor chair, features a curved frame and tapered legs.

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For the 2018 update, Ercol chose a pink hue for the main body of the Loveseat, while the top of the frame and tips of the chair legs have a cream shade – making the seat appear to have been partially submerged in colour.

The second piece, the Butterfly chair was first launched in 1956. It features distinctively curved plies that resemble the profile of butterfly wings – hence its name.

The updated version sees the chair's legs and frame coloured in a pink hue, while the seat and backrest remain a wooden finish.

Ercol was founded in 1920 by Lucian Ercolani. This is not the first time the company has created variations of its original designs – in 2016, it released a contemporary version of its Originals Room Divider.

The Half-Rose Originals collection launched during the January edition of Maison&Objet, which took place from 19 to 23 January.

Dezeen's pick of the best launches from the Paris fair included children's furniture made out of recycled plastic and wooden bookcases featuring discordant shelves.