The reflective exterior of Burberry's Jeju Island pop up shop

Commenter questions why Burberry designed "a building that could destroy thousands of birds"

In this week's comments update, readers are irritated by Burberry's design for a reflective pop-up store in South Korea and discussing other top stories.

British fashion brand Burberry has installed a pop-up store that reflects a surrounding mountain range on Jeju Island, South Korea, for its latest outerwear clothing collection.

The Imagined Landscapes Jeju installation is made from plywood, timber and a reflective polycarbonate mirror material.

"Out of touch in pretty much every way possible"

Commenters are annoyed. "Oh, the poor birds!" said Stefanos S. "Why are architects allowed to design reflective buildings? The design is great but the reflecting material is plain wrong."

Apsco Radiales agreed: "I can even get over the shape, the design, the location, but why in God's name are you building such a highly reflective building that will destroy thousands of birds?"

"Tomorrow's trash today!" continued Alexis Harrison. "Hopefully, South Korea has plenty of landfill space for all that non-circular polycarbonate and plywood once this gets discarded after a pitifully short life pleasuring a select few."

"Out of touch in pretty much every way possible," concluded Steve Leo.

Dezeen has asked Burberry if the building poses a risk for birds but hasn't yet had a response.

Are readers being harsh? Join the discussion ›

Aerial view of Stadium 974
Demountable stadium built with shipping containers reaches completion in Qatar

Commenter says "if buildings could virtue-signal," shipping container stadium "would be a role model"

Readers are debating a demountable stadium built with shipping containers, which is nearing completion in Qatar ahead of the FIFA 2022 World Cup.

"If this building actually gets disassembled and built somewhere else, it will be the architecture story of the decade," said Puzzello.

"From what I can see the stadium is not 'built with shipping containers,'" replied Walter Astor. "The stadium is built with steel and concrete and then some repurposed shipping containers were tacked on to allow a feeble claim to sustainability. If buildings could virtue-signal, this would be a role model."

Garlic agreed: "In what way is this sustainable? A few tokenistic shipping containers plonked on for aesthetics doesn't make it sustainable. And what happens to those after the World Cup?"

Is Stadium 974 a clever idea? Join the discussion ›

Virgil Abloh with an IKEA bag
Ten projects by Virgil Abloh that demonstrate his versatility as a designer

Readers believe Virgil Abloh "showed the world everything is possible"

Commenters, designers and creatives have paid their respects to Virgil Abloh following his death from cancer this week. We also rounded up 10 projects that illustrate the designer's boundary-pushing approach.

"Sad day," said Nir. "Rest in peace icon!"

"The legacy you left behind will always be remembered," added Lek. "You've shown the world everything is possible."

Haokip concluded: "Never a fan of his work, but sad that he passed away so young. God bless his family."

What was your most memorable project by Abloh? Join the discussion ›

Image of the cabin on a cliff edge
Zinc-clad hikers' cabin perches on a cliff edge in the Dolomites

Commenter calls hikers' cabin "superb in all aspects"

Readers are discussing a small cabin that Demogo has perched on the dramatic Marmarole mountain range in Northern Italy's Dolomites. It is meant as a refuge for hikers.

"This project is superb in all aspects," said Sheets. "Beautifully scaled, shaped, and sited – conscientiously and responsibly designed, expertly executed."

"Mixed feelings about this being an emergency shelter," continued JZ. "The last thing one probably requires is being perched in a wind-rattled box that appears to be intent on funneling off the edge of the mountain."

DY disagreed: "I do a tonne of multi-day mountaineering and in my opinion, this is fit for purpose. Beautifully designed and well located for visibility purposes. If you're worried about 'funneling off the edge' after a five-hour hike in steep terrain, then you shouldn't be up that high in the first place."

What do you think of the cabin? Join the discussion ›

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Dezeen is the world's most commented architecture and design magazine, receiving thousands of comments each month from readers. Keep up to date on the latest discussions on our comments page.