Het Zwarte Huis Bakers Architecten

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Het Zwarte Huis by Bakers Architecten

These brick-clad apartments in Utrecht, the Netherlands, by Dutch firm Bakers Architecten appear to float above a curtain wall of glazing.

Het Zwarte Huis Bakers Architecten

Het Zwarte Huis, or The Black House, is spread across three storeys with the upper two, which comprise six apartments, finished in Kolumba bricks.

Het Zwarte Huis Bakers Architecten

The ground floor, which forms an office, has become the architect's new premises.

Het Zwarte Huis Bakers Architecten

The block sits on the apex of a curved street with a double-height bay window affording panoramic views.

Het Zwarte Huis Bakers Architecten

The massing creates an internal courtyard overlooked by a metal-frame walkway.

Het Zwarte Huis Bakers Architecten

A semi-submerged garage is accessed from a car-lift in the courtyard.

Het Zwarte Huis Bakers Architecten

All photographs are by Maarten Noordijk and Frank Stahl.

Here's some more from the architects:


In Utrecht’s museum quarter, just south of the city centre, there was for many years a vacant plot on the corner of Lange Nieuwstraat and Vrouwjuttenstraat.

Het Zwarte Huis Bakers Architecten

This site in the midst of historical buildings is now occupied by ‘Het Zwarte Huis’ (The Black House), a complex containing six apartments with semi-underground parking and the new premises of Bakers Architecten.

Het Zwarte Huis Bakers Architecten

The streetscape is characterized by heterogeneous, lot-by-lot development with distinctive corner buildings.

Het Zwarte Huis Bakers Architecten

Het Zwarte Huis is a contemporary addition to the existing urban fabric, in which the notion of ‘living above work’ has been accentuated by placing the dwellings in a solid volume on top of a glazed podium.

Het Zwarte Huis Bakers Architecten

Lange Nieuwstraat begins at Domplein and runs via a gentle curve to the Centraal Museum.

Het Zwarte Huis Bakers Architecten

The site lies at the mid-point of the curve from where there is an overview of the entire street.

Het Zwarte Huis Bakers Architecten

This unique vantage point is fully exploited with a large bay window. [bay window]

Het Zwarte Huis by Bakers Architecten

An internal courtyard has been created by placing the black volume parallel to the Lange Nieuwstraat. This volume also contains the various means of access for the complex as a whole.

Het Zwarte Huis Bakers Architecten

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The semi-underground car park is reached via a car parking lift, while a communal staircase leads to the walkways along which the apartments are situated.

Het Zwarte Huis Bakers Architecten

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The wide walkways also serve as outdoor space for the dwellings. Het Zwarte Huis was constructed using 55-centimetre-long ‘Kolumba’ bricks. The apartments facing Vrouwjuttenstraat have a white rendered facade.

Het Zwarte Huis Bakers Architecten

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The party walls on this side form a cantilever on Vrouwenjuttenstraat, thereby relieving the podium facade of any structural function and allowing it to be entirely of glass.

Het Zwarte Huis Bakers Architecten

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HET ZWARTE HUIS, UTRECHT

function: atelier+ 6 apartements
location: Utrecht
architect: Bakers Architecten
project team: Jan Bakers, Martijn Boer, Erik Feenstra, Noor van de Loo, Remko Verkaar
client:Bakers Architecten bv, Utrecht & Van Bekkum Projecten bv, Hooglanderveen
structural engineering: CIHR bv, Delft

Het Zwarte Huis Bakers Architecten

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consultant: Campus Installatie Techniek BV, Barneveld IVL, Wijk bij Duurstede
lighting consultant: Maikel van Burik
contractor: Bouwonderneming Van Bekkum Houten, Houten
project area: 1100 m2
project year: 2010
Photographs:: Maarten Noordijk, Frank Stahl

Het Zwarte Huis Bakers Architecten

Click above for larger image


See also:

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  • philipwood

    Beautiful!

  • Kris HubO

    simple commercial architecture, 12 in a dozen…

    • tom

      I am really looking forward to see one of your creations. They must be amazing!

      • HubO

        some say so yes ;-) but i'm not comparing to my own work…
        Come on, every city, even every village has at least such a building. I just see a collection of modern, or more precisely 'trendy' materials and no beauty of form.
        It's not fault to be a little bit critical, is it?

  • Mark

    It's a house, not a museum. Remember that!

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000484007310 Johann Koenitz

    great piece of architecture. maybe a simple "commercial" – but has architecture always to be like gehry´s or hadid´s brutalism? fact is: there is loss "commercial" architecture with such good qualities as it could be. congrats!

  • http://twitter.com/ArdBuijsen @ArdBuijsen

    Since hen is architecture of Gehry or Hadid not commercial?

  • hdxtst

    -the access to the first floor to the conference room (with doble height), serves its porpouse to make it a memorable event to the future clients of the architecture firm
    -the working place feels confortable with a nice open yard (with the semipublic view of the street).
    -the main entrance to the firm, also can be use as a gallery for the firm's work. (public)
    -the 6 apartments has a good proportion for a single or a couple. and functions well with the atic space, too. which has it's independant entrance.

    two things comes to my mind that i would like to know:
    1.-I think that the garage could had been able to park 2 cars. as the car elevator gets down to the ground for the 1rst one and a 2nd one at the top of this mechanical structure could work. (of course, it needs a basic logistic of use)
    2.-Netherland's people: I would like to know, if u woudn't mind to live in a apartiment without ur own garage. (as i know, the use of bykes is common), so would u mind?

    nice project!!!

  • Leine

    @hdxtst

    1. When reading the floorplans, I think the garage actualy has enough space to park seven cars. So the car elevator is just the means to get your car to the groundfloor.

    2. Personally I don't mind, because indeed I ride a bike and use public transport. But when building in the Netherlands, there is a norm that says you have to build (at least) one parkingspace per new apartment/house. So for this project, I think, seven parkingspaces would have been the minimum, since there is six apartments and one company in the building.

    About the commercialism; This is not the generic stuff that comes to my mind when imagining the type of architecture that's the result of (just) making a profit.

    Why not make a house look like a house? I like it for the fact that it tells just that!

  • mmm

    Strangely schizophrenic: brave detailing, cowardish design?

    Personally, I like design being done with a fixed hand and a sharp pencil, as opposed to design by toolbox, by adding and distracting until the right visual compromise is found. This is a building that is schizofrenic in this sense; strangely compromisive from the outsie (black, white, bricks, glass, minimal detailing but 'contextual' formalism); the inside however is very confident and uncompromisive.

    It's not bad though. It's well built.

  • http://twitter.com/Ecomanta @Ecomanta

    This is actually a very sophisticated realization. To take a venacular and manipulate it into a disciplined modern structure shows restraint and creativity at the same time. The floating aspect of the house is spectacular and a feat of engineering. Impressive use of materials while finding the correct balance of light vs heavy.