House at Alibag by Malik Architecture

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House at Alibag by Malik Architecture

This jumbled house in India features an elevated steel tunnel, bridged corridors and a rooftop swimming pool on stilts.

House at Alibag by Malik Architecture

Designed by Indian studio Malik Architecture, House at Alibag is located on a hilltop facing the Mumbai skyline.

House at Alibag by Malik Architecture

Faceted walls and ceilings line rooms throughout the house and are perforated by both rectangular and triangular windows.

House at Alibag by Malik Architecture

At the centre of the three-storey building is an open courtyard, over-sailed by bridges connecting rooms on the first and second floors.

House at Alibag by Malik Architecture

The angled tunnel that drives through the upper storeys of the house encloses a bedroom at each end, joined by another of these bridges.

House at Alibag by Malik Architecture

The rooftop swimming pool shelters an external terrace at the rear of the house.

House at Alibag by Malik Architecture

This is the second project by Malik Architecture on Dezeen in the last few days - see our earlier story here about a cantilevering office block next to a slum.

House at Alibag by Malik Architecture

See also: more stories about projects in India.

House at Alibag by Malik Architecture

Photography is by Bharath Ramamrutham.

House at Alibag by Malik Architecture

Here are some more details from Malik Architecture:


House at Alibag

The Site:

The site for this home is a hill in Alibag, one which enjoys a stunning view, not only of the rolling contours surrounding it, but of the sea and the skyline of Mumbai in the distance. Conceptually, the design of the home is a departure from the “stepped terrace” typology that one would conventionally employ on a heavily contoured site.

House at Alibag by Malik Architecture

Instead, we chose to deconstruct a cuboid that is tilted and suspended over the ground and seems to simultaneously ‘float’ and ‘flow’ down the hill.The contours of the hill have been used to organize the structure over 3 levels.

House at Alibag by Malik Architecture

The ‘tube’ contains 2 large bedroom suites at different levels with a large interstitial void that is inhabited by floating connections.The creation of singular sensory experiences has been the primary organizing and sculpting vector.

House at Alibag by Malik Architecture

Numerous geometric inflections and articulations are designed to engage the senses in unconventional ways. A walk through the house is meant to yield unique moments of being suspended in space, of intimate enclosure, of vertiginous assaults but most importantly, of being connected to nature. The structure follows the design philosophy with concrete planes making contact with the ground, while steel floats above it. The home seems to conduct a constant dialogue with the ground on which it rests; it is informed by the earth but chooses at certain junctures to thrust over a precipice, completely oblivious of it.

House at Alibag by Malik Architecture

The hilltop location of this house makes its occupants privy to some spectacular views of the sea as well as of the surrounding terrain. It is the fact that every space is designed to partake of these views that renders the house unique. The transition form panoramic to framed portraits and the constant three dimensional articulation of the viewing platform is what generates an experience that transcends the pure visual and ventures into a multi-sensory realm. The only restriction was the self imposed one with regards to retaining the integrity of the hill and maximizing the sustainability of the development.

House at Alibag by Malik Architecture

A second home on the same site as house no. 1 was commissioned only weeks after construction began on the first house.  We were now faced with the conundrum of creating a complementary foil to the distinctly extroverted structure that was perched on the apex of the hill. On the one hand we felt that the second home ought to partake of the   same    stunning    views    that    presented themselves to the first house, but any significant built up mass would not only compete with but   also   vitiate   the   geometric singularity of the first home.

House at Alibag by Malik Architecture

The   solution presented self in the form of an existing degraded concrete structure that was intended to be a home for the land’s previous owner.  By locating the second home on this footprint and by making use of the already excavated area, we were able    to   submerge   the   house    beneath the ground.  The only trace of development, when viewed from the first home, was a crystalline    fragment emerging from the earth.  The home is self effacing, a more discrete and introverted alter-ego of its hilltop sibling.

House at Alibag by Malik Architecture

Faceted Roof Design:

The main roof of the living room and verandah is a re-interpretation of the traditional clay tiled roof, but re-designed for better performance. It has been parametrically manipulated to dip and extend to provide weather protection for the main pool deck, the entrance verandah and the car porch. In addition it sweeps upwards to allow headroom for the stair leading to the upper level.High wind speeds and heavy rains necessitated re-analysis of the traditional pitched roof which while performing well in homogenous spatial conditions, failed to meet the multiple performance criteria we required.

House at Alibag by Malik Architecture

Floating Infinity Pool with Verandah Below:

Part of the client’s brief was the desire to have the primary living space (living room) and verandah in close proximity to the swimming pool. We used the contours of the hill to design a stilted pool that satisfied the client’s requirements and also provided an auxiliary shaded verandah below it opened onto a large garden and which could be used in inclement weather.The knife edge was created to merge the pool foreground with the background of the Arabian Sea.

House at Alibag by Malik Architecture

Tubular Steel Truss

The ‘Tube’ that rests on the two blocks is tilted at an angle that is almost identical to the natural slope of the ground and with a single gesture, a tangible link to the hill is created, whilst simultaneously generating a physically liberated space. The earth is forced into the centre of the home, whose vertical proportions complement the intrinsic horizontality of the geometry. Similar programs are linked by the volume and its skins provide weather protection to the bridge connections hovering within the courtyard.

House at Alibag by Malik Architecture

The concept of the floating tube allowed for the elevated perch which was desired to give the occupant the best possible view of the surroundings without creating large obtrusive footprints on the ground.The house functions as a tool to interpret the landscape. At numerous junctures, the object dematerializes to create a sense of floating amongst the elements, and its unique strength is the varying experiential conditions it creates at different points in space and time.

House at Alibag by Malik Architecture

Category: Residential
Location: Alibag, Maharashtra, India
Client: Private
Plot area: 7 acres
Built-up area: 11500 sq. ft.
Project cost: 5,00,00,000 (5 Cr.)
Commencement date: March 2007
Completion date: September 2009

House at Alibag by Malik Architecture

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House at Alibag by Malik Architecture

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House at Alibag by Malik Architecture

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House at Alibag by Malik Architecture

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  • swapnil

    superb,loved the pool

  • Rajeev

    Great!
    I am in India and this is happening here!
    It's music to my eyes.

  • http://www.pdmdesign.com Leiurus

    Incredibly messy, complicated and gratuitous. Such a shame to waste this stunning view. At least it makes the vista from the pool even more enjoyable, as when looking in that direction most of the house is not visible.

    • JimW

      Agreed! Complexity for the mere sake of complexity and grabbing attention. Stop trying so hard to "be" something.

      • Jos

        I love the fact that amongst all the deco "stuff" there is what looks like an A typical house/shack…. a little odd.

  • Colonel Pancake

    Despite the fact that the house is over-designed in the worst possible way, that pool is really great.

  • I.P. Freely

    "Why do I always feel on edge in this house?" Agreed…the pool is amazing.

  • zee

    Total disregard for site
    + intense material overkill
    + messy habitable space

    = I feel nauseous

    The kind of project that gets me seriously worried about what money makes possible.

    • jos

      + 2 bahaus Breuer chairs….. cause that makes sense…

  • yuc

    My confused ideas about this house may be best explained by a quote from an episode of Star Trek TV series:

    "Quite simply captain, I examined the problem from all angles, and it was plainly hopeless. Logic informed me that under the circumstances, the only logical action would have to be one of desperation. Logical decision, logically arrived at." — Spock to Captain Kirk, Galileo Seven)
    From: http://www.sjtrek.com/trek/quotes/S_TheOriginalSe

  • http://www.redmachinestudio.com alexg

    Convoluted mess…Over-design much?

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100002441417175 Dave Carcamano

    Libeskind on acid.

  • Roger

    What a pathetic solution, for what looks like a wonderful site…mangled maze of metal, kinda looks like a demolition project stopped mid-way.
    "The only restriction was the self imposed one with regards to retaining the integrity of the hill and maximizing the sustainability of the development" Surely you're joking Mr Malik!!!
    Basic design 101 input needed…

  • Daniel

    So the saga of that massively ugly office bldg that towers over the Mumbai slum continues….Seriously, this architect should be BANNED from practicising !

    Though he/she will fit in well in the mother ship with Sigourney Weaver en route to an alien planet with stuffed with equally ugly creatures.

  • Megan Sult

    Why is dezeen continuing to feature such monstrosity from the same firm ? Are you guys trying to boost viewership by inciting negative comments ?

    Heaven's sake, please do some filtering/editing.

  • Daniel

    Btw, the last 8th pic, I think, shows the handrail abruptly abutting the tv wall.

    It is pure stupidity with scant regard for functionality and userbility. If the architect is unable to address such basic requirement for safety use of staircase, he/she is not qualified to design a house. A zoo, maybe.

  • mawdster

    "Somtimes the needs of the money outweigh the needs of the few" …Spock

  • http://twitter.com/johncatao @johncatao

    This house is like modern art. unconventional. Very few people might like it and understand. Very few architects have the guts to try something like this. The moment people don't see straight lines and conventional shapes they panic. AS you can see in majority of the comments. Maybe this house is too much out there. And too complicated. Just like abstract art.

    • zee

      sorry man.
      people like and understand things when they are GOOD – straight or crooked.

      this is just plain BAD.

      note: unlike work by Frank Gehry, who at least has the talent required to (most of the time) assemble geometries gracefully and make emotionally powerful structures.

    • jos

      Its nothing new…. The deco crew have been at this for over 30 years…. Hadid probably sketched this very house in 83…

      I'm sure most comments are from people all to aware that this is Not a new direction.

  • Rahul

    So we now have a Frank Gehry amidst us… Stop them BOTH.

  • zeemmee

    Question is whether u can appreciate when things get complicated to create a living space?
    Question is can u possibily comunicate, design, Convince,Imagine create such complexcity?
    Question is are u educated enough to appreciate design?
    No SOME OF YOU are not, So keep your philistine comments to yourself.
    & yes stop blaming Dezeen. PEACE.

  • Cubasur

    Seriously agree with Megan on that. Just when you think underrepresented India is being showcased, you get projects like these that will convince u there is no original modern Indian architecture since Corb/Kahn days. Good people of Dezeen – give us more Studio Mumbai, Serie, Matharoo

  • xtiaan

    This house just screams IM RICH! REALLY REALLY REALLY RICH! (and i ordered all my furniture straight out of wallpaper magazine). Its reassuring to know money cant buy taste.

  • http://www.fluidstonestudio.co.uk Nathan

    The first photo reminds me of motorway service station foot bridge. But the pool is pretty amazing