Project R6 by REX

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Project R6 by Rex

Skyscrapers in Seoul: New York firm REX was another of the seventeen architects commissioned to design skyscrapers for the fast-growing Yongsan International Business District of Seoul, South Korea. They've proposed a tower that looks like like a filing cabinet with its drawers open.

Project R6 by Rex

Top and above: images are by Luxigon

A hollow centre and large courtyard garden will be revealed at the heart of the 144-metre-high building, which is titled Project R6.

Project R6 by Rex

Above: image is by Luxigon

A series of compact apartments will overlook this courtyard from within the tower's upper storeys, while shops will surround it on the lower levels.

Project R6 by Rex

Above: image is by Luxigon

The apartments are designed to accomodate short-term occupants, so few will have a footprint greater than 40 square metres and each will incorporate space-saving measures such as moving walls and fold-away bedrooms.

Project R6 by Rex

The project is due to complete in 2016.

Project R6 by Rex

The Yongsan International Business District was masterplanned by Daniel Libeskind and is the biggest urban development project in South Korea. Due for completion in 2024, the masterplan was commissioned by South Korean developer DreamHub.

Project R6 by Rex

Other projects featured so far from the district include a building shaped like a hash symbol and two towers that resemble the exploding World Trade Centre on 9/11. See all the stories here.

Project R6 by Rex

Images are by REX apart from where otherwise stated.

Here's some more information from REX:


Yongsan International Business District “Project R6”
Seoul, Korea

YIBD “Project R6” is an urban boutique residence for short-term business people, young urban professionals, and foreign residents.

Project R6 by Rex

Above: image is by Luxigon

Due to the transience of its target users and the short durations during which they are home, R6’s unit sizes are small, including 40 m2, 50 m2, and 60 m2 residences, with the majority being 40 m2.

Project R6 by Rex

Above: image is by Luxigon

To meet the trends of its users and compensate for its small unit size, R6 must engender a strong sense of community and its residences must be highly attractive, providing generous views, daylight, and cross-ventilation.

Project R6 by Rex

Maximizing daylight and cross-ventilation are also paramount to providing a highly sustainable residence.

Project R6 by Rex

In a standard housing tower, 40 m2 to 60 m2 units would create poorly dimensioned and oppressive residences, offering constrained views, little daylight, and poor ventilation, and community would be limited to activities at the tower’s base.

Project R6 by Rex

By pulling layers of the typical housing tower in opposing directions, the small units maintain their size, but are stretched into favorable proportions that provide views and daylight from both sides, excellent cross-ventilation, and a strong sense of community through the creation of a central courtyard, roof terraces, and conversation/reading/play pods.

Project R6 by Rex

The stretched layers are strategically positioned to guarantee unobstructed daylight into all units, and to create adequate continuity of the building’s primary structure: a concrete-encased steel mega-brace that encircles the courtyard.

Project R6 by Rex

The mega-brace supports a shelf-like matrix of walls and floor slabs that define each unit. Into each shelf is inserted a wooden shell containing a bathroom on one side and a kitchen on the other.

Project R6 by Rex

A movable wall—using standard compact shelving technology—shifts within the unit to define a bedroom (adjacent to the bathroom) or a living room (adjacent to the kitchen). The wall includes a bed, nightstands, couch, television mount, task lights, and storage.

Project R6 by Rex

A high-performance façade—composed of frameless IGUs—emphasizes the remarkable exterior views while interior black-out and shade roller blinds control sunlight and glare.

Project R6 by Rex

The floor to ceiling interior façade—also composed of frameless IGUs and equipped with black-out and shade roller blinds—provides spatial relief and a sense of community while maintaining privacy.

Project R6 by Rex

The resulting architecture provides views and daylight from both sides, and excellent cross-ventilation.

Project R6 by Rex

Community and spatial relief are further generated by conversation/reading/play pods extending into the courtyard.

Project R6 by Rex

The pods playfully assume the varying widths of the walls behind such that no views are blocked and privacy in the units is maintained.

Project R6 by Rex

Block R6 is a narrow parcel bounded by the planned Mountain Park—including Children’s Interactive Spray Park, Rail Road Museum, Outdoor Amphitheater, and Yongsan Station Esplanade—and the central park of the planned development Zone B3, adjacent to Hangang-ro. By placing the building to the south of Block R6, all units command great views and the building forms a gateway to YIBD from Hangang-ro.

Project R6 by Rex

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Client: Dreamhub Project Financing Vehicle Co., Ltd.

Project R6 by Rex

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Program: 47,800 m2 (514,500 sf) of luxury housing for short-term residents, 27,000 m2 (290,600 sf) of retail, and 929 parking stalls

Project R6 by Rex

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Area: 115,500 m2 (1,240,000 sf)

Project R6 by Rex

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Construction budget: Confidential

Project R6 by Rex

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Status: Commenced 2011; completed Schematic Design 2012; completion expected 2016

Project R6 by Rex

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Design architect: REX

Project R6 by Rex

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Key personnel: Tiago Barros, Adam Chizmar, Danny Duong, Luis Gil, Gabriel Jewell-Vitale, SeokHun Kim, Armen Menendian, Romea Muryń, Roberto Otero, Se Yoon Park, Joshua Prince-Ramus, Lena Reeh Rasmussen, Yuan Tiauriman

Project R6 by Rex

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Executive architect: Mooyoung

Project R6 by Rex

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Consultants: Barker Mohandas, Buro Happold, Front, Level Acoustics, Magnusson Klemencic, Scape, Shen Milsom Wilke, Tillotson Design

Project R6 by Rex

  • akim

    What about its context? No consideration of the surroundings nor the relationship at the street level.

    • Chris

      It's taken into consideration that no other Architect has taken the context into consideration, therefore it's responding by being just as ignorant.

    • https://www.facebook.com/gouverneur.cadwalader Gouverneur Schuyler Cadwalader

      context shmontext.

  • Lackey

    Hey, something quite different, I dig it. Good on them for getting it built too, my design professors would kick my ass for an envelope that massive, hehe.

  • alex

    whilst at first glance the overall form looks a bit kitsch (Civil Justice Centre, Mancester, anyone? http://cubeme.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2007/06… the floorplans do have some beauty about them. I hope they'll convince the developer to move forward with it.

  • H-J

    The diagrams made me smile.

  • Grapes

    Really NIce Renders! BIG style diagrams seems to be taking over!

    This Corbusier would approve of the Living Pods.

    dont know if i like the architecture or not, but I think REX are good architects.

    Lovely Idea and beautiful presented,

    This should be a standard,.

    Hats off.

  • http://www.buzzbooksonline.com MrJ

    I do find this sort of solution rather depressing. I acknowledge its cleverness in providing a mechanical solution to a brief, but it lacks even the slightest nod to South Korea's architectural heritage.

    Seoul has enough survivors to provide some sort of inspiration – the Namdaemun (Great South Gate) is just one example, but there are many others.

    It's much the same in the UK, where the country has been – and continues to be – covered with identikit housing estates, with little or no respect given to local materials or vernacular use of them.

  • https://www.facebook.com/darek.astapov Darek Arya Astapov

    interesting, but…
    does anyone know what building is on the third picture on the left? not the tall one, the round one. sees more interesing to me.

  • qhsj

    I have a lot of admiration for REX and I do like that they do not accept the standard tower housing typology but this does not seem like a huge improvement (for what must be a huge structural cost to cantilever and brace thin profiles). The main gain by "stretching" the tower is the inside space, but in the trade-off privacy is compromised for the residents by opening all of them up to public hallways. The inner space will soon be a composition of curtains. Also aren't those apartment doors supposed to open the other way? I know that's a small thing but this project is supposedly far along…

  • http://dailygrail.com/ Red Pill Junkie

    It looks like a filing cabinet because some of the apartments are so small the tenants will feel like socks in a drawer.

  • Andrea

    I like the concept, sort of a hotel super lobby en plein air, but some elements do not convice me: why stairs are parallel to the facades of the building and not perpendicular? They could provide additional residential area ($$$) and structural rigidity integrating what the architects call the mega brace (check out REX website).
    Grouped elevators don’t seem to represent the best solution in terms of vertical circulation: units far from the cores could show a lack of accessibility, units close to the cores could see their privacy compromised by the passage of neighbors reaching/leaving theirs homes.
    Early concept renderings showed distributed exposed elevators, in my opinion a more efficient and spectacular solution
    Just saying of course

  • Dayo

    @qhsj–the door direction is typical for apartments in Korea. I was thrown off too when I moved there.

  • H.T.K.

    The future looks bleak … very, very bleak.

  • Max

    REX – BIG – SOM – MVRDV – PIM – PUM – PAM
    What's going on?
    Im taking a nap…call me when all this en!

  • Shahad F.

    Even though the design of the building looks similar to all the buildings now being built, I dig the diagrams illustrating the concept! Intelligent structuring of building and high-performance facade. Good concept for a busy urban transient fabric.